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How To Use An Inhaler | How To Use A Ventolin Inhaler Properly Correctly | Asthma Inhaler Technique
 
03:03
How To Use An Inhaler | How To Use A Ventolin Inhaler Correctly Properly | Asthma Inhaler Technique Without Spacer This weeks video is my most complete guide to using a metered dose inhaler when you don't have a spacer device with you. Make sure to watch it all and I promise you will be a metered dose inhaler pro at the end of it. Sponsored by DoctorFox: https://www.doctorfox.co.uk An estimated 90% of patients use their metered dose inhaler incorrectly. Inadequate inhaler technique lowers drug deposition to the lungs, wastes medication and may lead to poor disease control, reduced quality of life, increased emergency hospital admissions and higher treatment costs. Please spread the word to friends and family - Like, Share & Tag a Friend. So they can also master their inhaler technique and manage their respiratory condition better. COMMON INHALER TECHNIQUE MISTAKES: • Not breathing out first. When you breathe out fully (or as much as you comfortably can) just before taking your inhaler, you create more space in your airways for your next breath in. This means that you can breathe in deeper and for longer when you inhale your asthma medicine - giving it the best chance of reaching the small airways deep inside your lungs, and being most effective. • Not holding your breath after taking your inhaler. If you've been advised to hold your breath after taking in your inhaler, it's very important to do so. When you hold your breath after inhaling the medicine, you are keeping your airways still. This gives more time for the medicine to get into your lungs. If you can hold your breath for 10 seconds, this is ideal but if this isn't possible, you will still benefit by holding it for as long as you feel comfortable. • Not priming the aerosol inhaler device Aerosol inhalers require priming (so you get the right amount of medicine when you use it) before using for the first time, or if they have not been used for a while - always refer to information leaflet. • Not shaking your MDI before use and between puffs. If you don't shake the canister, the asthma medicine and propellant (the substance which helps turn the medicine into aerosol form) will not mix together properly and too much or too little of one will be released. • Inhaling too early before pressing the canister. If you're already half way through breathing in by the time the medicine is released from the inhaler, you won't have enough time to finish breathing in all the medicine because your lungs will already be full. If this happens, some of the medicine will end up being sprayed in your mouth and hitting the back of your throat and not being carried down to your lungs where it's needed. • Inhaling too late after pressing the canister (unless you're using a spacer). It takes less than half a second from the time the canister is pressed for all the medicine inside the inhaler to be released. If you breathe in after this time, some of the medicine will end up being sprayed in your mouth and not to your lungs where it's needed. • Not leaving enough time between doses. You need to give your inhaler a good shake between doses and then wait at least 30 to 60 seconds before taking the next puff. JUST ASK: If you're ever unsure about your inhaler technique always double check with your pharmacist, nurse practitioner or GP. HOW TO TREAT AN ASTHMA ATTACK VIDEO LINK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmDL3iA9Zu4 Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. • How to use an inhaler • How to use a inhaler • How to use an inhaler properly • How to use an inhaler correctly • How to use a Venolin inhaler • How to use an asthma inhaler • Inhaler technique • How to use an inhaler for the first time • How to use a Salamol inhaler • How to use a Ventolin inhaler correctly • How to use a Ventolin inhaler properly • How to use inhaler • How to use inhaler without spacer • How to use inhaler correctly • How to use inhaler properly
Views: 91501 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Use A Spacer With Inhaler | How To Use Spacer Device | How To Use Aerochamber With Ventolin
 
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How To Use A Spacer For Children & Adults | How To Use Spacer With Mask & Without Mask | How To Use Aerochamber With Inhaler | How To Use Aerochamber With Mask & Without Mask Hey guys! This weeks video is my most complete guide to using a metered dose inhaler with a spacer device. Make sure to watch it all and I promise you will be an inhaler and spacer device pro at the end of it. An estimated 90% of patients use their metered dose inhaler incorrectly. Inadequate inhaler technique lowers drug deposition to the lungs, wastes medication and may lead to poor disease control, reduced quality of life, increased emergency hospital admissions and higher treatment costs. Please spread the word to friends and family - Like, Share & Tag a Friend. So they can also master their inhaler technique when using a spacer device and manage their respiratory condition better. HOW TO USE A SPACER WITH INHALER 1) Remove the inhaler and spacer cap. Carefully examine the products for damage, missing parts, or foreign objects. Remove any foreign objects prior to use. The products should be replaced immediately if there are any damaged or missing parts. 2) Firmly fit the two halves of the spacer together (If necessary). 3) Stand or sit upright when using your inhaler and spacer. 4) If you are starting a new inhaler or have not used the inhaler for more than one week you must prime your inhaler. Please read the information leaflet of your inhaler for instructions. 5) Hold the inhaler upright, insert into the spacer and shake 4 or 5 times. 6) Breathe out gently. 7) (Mouthpiece Spacer - Adults) Place the mouthpiece between your teeth without biting and form a good seal around it with your lips. 7) (Masked Spacer - Adults & Children) Apply mask to face and ensure an effective seal. 8) (Mouthpiece Spacer - Single Breath Technique - Adults) Press the inhaler at the beginning of a slow inhalation. Breathe in slowly and deeply through the mouth until a full breath has been taken. Hold breath for 5-10 seconds or however much comfortable. 8) (Mouthpiece Spacer - Tidal Breathing Technique - Adults) Press the inhaler at the beginning of a slow inhalation. Breathe in slowly and deeply through the mouth until a full breath has been taken. Keep lips tight on the mouthpiece breathing normally 2-3 times through the chamber. 8) (Masked Spacer - Tidal Breathing Technique - Adults & Children) Press the inhaler at the beginning of a slow inhalation. Breathe in slowly and deeply through the mask until a full breath has been taken. Keep mask tight on the face breathing normally 5-6 times through the chamber. 9) If you have done the SINGLE BREATHING TECHNIQUE remove mouthpiece from you mouth and hold your breath for 10 seconds or as long as is comfortable. 9) If you have done the TIDAL BREATHING TECHNIQUE, holding your breath is not necessary simply remove spacer. 10) If you have been advised to take another dose repeat the process again after 30-60 seconds. 11) Remove inhaler from spacer and replace the caps straight away to keep out dust. HOW TO USE INHALER WITHOUT A SPACER I made a video on this a couple of months ago, feel free to watch it if you currently don't have a spacer device, https://youtu.be/iO8HpORGHOA USEFUL TIPS • Ensure the spacer is the correct one to fit your inhaler. • If your inhaler contains a corticosteroid rinse your mouth out with water after your dose. • If you're ever unsure about your inhaler technique always double check with your pharmacist, nurse practitioner or GP. • Always read the patient leaflet provided with your inhaler and spacer for any specific instructions. USEFUL LINK https://www.asthma.org.uk/advice/inhalers-medicines-treatments/inhalers-and-spacers/spacers/ http://www.aerochambervhc.com/instructions-for-use Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 69862 AbrahamThePharmacist
Sore Throat | How To Get Rid Of A Sore Throat (2019)
 
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Sore throat remedies. This video is on home remedies, medicine, causes and treatment to get rid of a sore throat fast. Sore throats are very common and usually nothing to worry about. They normally get better by themselves within a week. I've received a lot of messages to make a video on sore throat remedies and treatments. Which makes sense as I guess it's that time of the year. Hope my tips help! Remain positive and keep on being amazing - Happy New Year Everyone! SORE THROAT SYMPTOMS: Sore throat (pharyngitis) is very common. It is usually caused by an infection in the throat. Soreness ins the throat may be the only symptom. In addition, you may also have: • A hoarse voice. • A mild cough. • A high temperature (fever). • A headache. • A feeling of wanting to be sick (nausea). • Tiredness. • Swollen glands in your neck. • Pain when you swallow. SORE THROAT CAUSES: Sore throats are usually caused by viruses (like cold or flu) or from smoking. Very occasionally they can be caused by bacteria. SORE THROAT TREATMENT: To help soothe a sore throat and shorten how long it lasts you can: • For sore throats the first things I nearly always advise to patients is to gargle warm salty water because it’s actually really effective, inexpensive and everyone can do it at home. Gargling warm salty water helps soothe the throat and reduce inflammation. Just dissolve half a teaspoon of salt in a glass of part cooled boiled water and gargle. It’s important not to swallow the salt water which its not suitable for children. • Have enough fluids to avoid dehydration, I know it’s tempting not to drink much especially when it’s painful to swallow. But you can quite easily become dehydrated when your not well and may have a high temperature. Becoming dehydrated can make headaches and tiredness much worse and can even slow down recovery time. So aim for 6-8 glasses a day and try to avoid drinking hot drinks as they can actually make the sore throat pain worst. • Eat cool or soft foods • Avoid smoking or smoky places • Suck ice cubes, ice lollies or hard sweets – but don't give young children anything small and hard to suck because of the risk of choking • Rest • Paracetamol and ibuprofen, these pain killers are great at reducing sore throat pain and also reducing a fever. To keep sore throat symptoms at a minimum it’s best to take a dose at regular intervals as directed by your pharmacist or on the medication packet. • Medicated lozenges containing local anaesthetics like benzocaine, hexylresorcinol or an anti inflammatory like flurbiprofen. Have also shown some evidence to reduce sore throat pain by a small amount, these can be used alongside paracetamol too. As always with all medication always read the information leaflet and speak to your pharmacist to make sure you are suitable to take it. WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR: See a GP if: • Your sore throat doesn't improve after a week • You often get sore throats • You're worried about your sore throat • You have a sore throat and a very high temperature, or you feel hot and shivery • You have a weakened immune system – for example, because of diabetes or chemotherapy • A severe or long-lasting sore throat could be something like strep throat (a bacterial throat infection) Call 999 (Ambulance) if: • You have difficulty swallowing or breathing • You're drooling • You're making a high-pitched sound as you breathe (called stridor) • Your symptoms are severe and getting worse quickly These symptoms can make breathing more difficult. For more information on when to see your doctor please visit to following links: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/sore-throat/ https://patient.info/health/sore-throat-2/features/when-to-worry-about-a-sore-throat Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/+AbrahamThePharmacist https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 163717 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Treat Insomnia Naturally Without Medication Fix Sleeping Problems | Best Way To Sleep Better
 
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How To Cure Insomnia Naturally Without Medication | Get Rid Of Sleeping Problems | Best Way To Sleep Better At Night Hey guys! This weeks video is all about insomnia and how to treat it naturally without the use of medication. I see many patients who have insomnia and most of the time they want sleeping tablets - But actually most pharmacists, GPs, nurse practitioners prefer not to recommend sleeping tablets. As insomnia can often be improved by changing your daytime and bedtime habits or by improving your bedroom environment. See your GP, Pharmacist or Nurse Practitioner if you're still having difficulty getting to sleep after trying these techniques. WHAT IS INSOMNIA? Insomnia means poor sleep. About one third of adults do not get as much sleep as they would like. Poor sleep can mean: • Not being able to get off to sleep. • Waking up too early. • Waking for long periods in the night. • Not feeling refreshed after a night's sleep. If you have poor sleep, particularly over a long period of time, it can severely affect your life, as it can cause: • Tiredness (fatigue) and loss of energy in the daytime. • Poor concentration. • Loss of interest in usual activities. Irritability. • Depression and anxiety. • Inability to do things as well or as much as usual. • A worse quality of life. WHAT IS A NORMAL AMOUNT OF SLEEP? About 6-9 hours per night is average for most adults. Most people establish a pattern that is normal for them in their early adult life. However, as you become older, it is normal to sleep less. For most people it takes less than thirty minutes to fall asleep. So, everyone is different. What is important is that the amount of sleep that you get should be sufficient for you, and that you usually feel refreshed and not sleepy during the daytime. HOW TO SLEEP BETTER? Insomnia can often be improved by changing your daytime and bedtime habits or by improving your bedroom environment. Making small changes may help you to get a good night's sleep. Try some of the methods below for a few weeks to see if they help. See your GP, Pharmacist or Nurse Practitioner if you're still having difficulty getting to sleep after trying these techniques. DAYTIME HABITS: • Set a specific time for getting up each day. Try to stick to this time, seven days a week, even if you feel you haven't had enough sleep. This should help you sleep better at night. • Don't take a nap during the day. • Exercise daily, but don't exercise for at least four hours before going to bed. BEDTIME HABITS: • Stop drinking tea and coffee for a few hours before bedtime. • Avoid drinking alcohol and smoking, particularly shortly before going to bed. • Don't eat a big meal just before bedtime. • Don't use back-lit electronic devices shortly before going to bed. • Don't lie in bed feeling anxious about lack of sleep. Instead, get up, go to another room for about 20 minutes and do something else, such as reading or listening to soft music, before trying again. • Write a list of your worries and any ideas to solve them before going to bed. This may help you forget about them until the morning. • Link to relaxation techniques: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/ways-relieve-stress/? BEDROOM ENVIRONMENT: • Use thick blinds or curtains or wear an eye mask if the early morning sunlight or bright street lamps affect your sleep. • Make sure your bedroom is at a comfortable temperature for sleeping. • Wear ear plugs if noise is a problem. • Don't use your bedroom for anything other than sleeping or sex. Avoid watching television, making phone calls, eating or working while you're in bed. • Make sure your mattress is comfortable and that you have a pillow you like, as well as adequate bedding for the time of year. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 102292 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Take Levothyroxine Properly | Best Way To Take Thyroid Medication | When To Take Synthroid
 
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How To Take Synthroid Properly | Best Way To Take Levothyroxine Correctly | When To Take Thyroid Medication After Eating Hey guys! This weeks video is all about how to take your thyroid medication properly to get the most out of it. Levothyroxine is a medicine used to treat an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) which affects 1 in 70 women and 1 in 1,000 men in the UK. The thyroid gland makes thyroid hormone which helps to control energy levels and growth. Levothyroxine is taken to replace the missing thyroid hormone. KEY FACTS: • Levothyroxine starts working straight away, but it may be several weeks before your symptoms start to improve. • The most common side effects of levothyroxine are caused by taking a bigger dose than you need. Your doctor can lower your dose to help reduce any side effects. • Before you start taking levothyroxine, your healthcare professional will do a blood test to see what dose you need. Once you start taking the medicine you'll have regular blood tests to see how well it’s working. HOW AND WHEN TO TAKE: • Unless told otherwise by your prescriber or healthcare professional take levothyroxine once a day in the morning, ideally at least 30-60 minutes before having breakfast or a drink containing caffeine like tea or coffee. • Both breakfast and caffeinated drinks can stop your body taking in levothyroxine properly so it doesn't work as well. • If you can't take it first thing in the morning on an empty stomach take levothyroxine at least 2 hours after eating food. • If you buy any medicines, check with a pharmacist that they are safe to take with levothyroxine. Levothyroxine should not be taken at the same time as indigestion remedies or preparations containing calcium or iron (which are contained in some vitamin products). These types of medicines reduce the amount of levothyroxine absorbed by your body. Leave at least 2-4 hours between taking your dose of levothyroxine and any such preparation. • Soya interferes with thyroxine absorption, therefore if you are taking thyroxine you should try to avoid soya. If you wish to take soya, there should be as long a time interval as possible between eating the soya and taking the thyroxine. • Avoid products such as kelp, as they may interfere with thyroid function & wellbeing. Kelp is derived from seaweed and is naturally high in iodine. Because of this it is sometimes marketed as a "thyroid booster" and can be purchased in dry preparations and tablets. As with iodine itself, it is of no health benefit to those with thyroid disease. • Levothyroxine medication interactions link - https://bnf.nice.org.uk/interaction/levothyroxine.html (THIS LINK ONLY WORKS IF YOU LIVE IN THE UK. -Here's an alternative, pop in all your medicines and check for specific interactions- https://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.html BLOOD TESTS: Your healthcare professional will do regular blood tests to check the levels of thyroid hormones in your body before and after starting levothyroxine. These will allow your doctor to adjust your dose to suit you. At the start of treatment you can expect to have blood tests often. Once your hormone levels are stable, you’ll usually have a blood test after 4 to 6 months, and after that once a year. You may need blood tests more often if you: • Are pregnant • Start or stop a medicine that can interfere with levothyroxine • Have any symptoms that could mean your dose is not quite right MISSED DOSES: If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember, unless it's almost time for your next dose. In which case just skip the forgotten dose. Do not take 2 doses together to make up for a missed dose. If you forget doses often, it may help to set an alarm to remind you. You could also ask your pharmacist for advice on other ways to help you remember to take your medicine. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 57081 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Treat A Cold | How To Cure Common Cold | Best Medicine For A Cold And Fever And Sore Throat
 
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How To Treat A Cold | How To Cure Common Cold | Best Medicine For A Cold, Fever & Sore Throat OTC Pharmacy Medicine A cold is a mild viral infection of the nose, throat, sinuses and upper airways. It's very common and usually clears up on its own within a week or two. Adults have an average of two to three colds a year. Children have an average of five to six colds a year. Young children in nursery schools may average up to twelve colds per year. The main symptoms of a cold include: • Sore throat • Blocked or runny nose • Sneezing • Cough More severe symptoms, including a high temperature (fever), headache and aching muscles can also occur, although these tend to be associated more with flu. WHAT TO DO: There's no cure for a cold, but you can look after yourself at home by, • Resting, drinking plenty of fluids and eating healthily. • Taking over-the-counter painkillers, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen to help with headaches, temperatures and even sore throats. • Using decongestant sprays to relieve a blocked nose. • Trying remedies such as gargling salt water to help with a sore throat (not suitable for children). Many painkillers, decongestants and other medicines are available from pharmacies without a prescription. When buying any medicine please always run it by your pharmacist so you they can make sure these medicines are ok for you to take. WHEN TO SEE YOUR GP: You only really need to contact your GP if: • Your symptoms persist for more than three weeks. • Your symptoms get suddenly worse. • You have breathing difficulties. • You develop complications of a cold, such as chest pain or coughing up bloodstained mucus. It might also be a good idea to speak to your Pharmacist or GP if you're concerned about your baby or an elderly person, or if you have a long-term illness such as a lung condition. You can also phone NHS 111 for advice. HOW TO STOP THE SPREAD OF A COLD: You can take some simple steps to help prevent the spread of a cold. For example: • Use your own cup, plates, cutlery and kitchen utensils. • Don't share towels or toys with someone who has a cold • Wash your hands regularly, particularly before touching your nose or mouth and before handling food. • Always sneeze and cough into tissues – this will help prevent the virus-containing droplets from your nose and mouth entering the air, where they can infect others; you should throw away used tissues immediately and wash your hands. • Clean surfaces regularly to keep them free of germs. For more information on stopping the spread visit: https://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Cold-common/Pages/Introduction.aspx Here are some related keywords for this video: • How to treat a cold • How to cure common cold • Best medicine for a cold • Best medicine for a cold and fever • Best medicine for a cold and sore throat • Best OTC medicine for a cold • Best medicine for a cold and congestion • What to do with a cold • How to treat common cold • How to cure a cold • Best medicine to treat a cold • Best medicine to cure a cold • Best medicine to treat common cold • Best medicine to cure common cold • Pharmacy medicine for a cold • OTC medicine cold Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 255550 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Do Warm Compress For Eye | How To Do Eyelid Massage | How To Treat Blepharitis At Home (2018)
 
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Blepharitis Eyelid Hygiene | How To Clean Eyelids | How To Clean Eyelids With Baby Shampoo | Blepharitis Treatment At Home | Medical Eyelid Hygiene | Lid Massage Hey guys! I get asked quite often by patients how they should clean their eyelids to help prevent blepharitis. So here is a complete guide to cleaning your eyelids properly including warm compress, eyelid massage and eyelid cleaning. Let me know how you get on with this and if you have any tips please leave a comment below. WHAT IS BLEPHARITIS: Blepharitis means inflammation of the eyelids. It causes the eyes to feel sore and gritty. It can be a troublesome and recurring condition with no one-off cure. However, once symptoms have improved, daily eyelid hygiene can usually keep symptoms to a minimum. SYMPTOMS OF BLEPHARITIS: • The main symptom is sore eyelids. Both eyes are usually affected. • The eyes may feel gritty, itchy or as though they are burning. • The eyelids may look inflamed or greasy. • The eyes may become sticky with discharge. In particular, the eyelids may stick together in the morning. • Sometimes tiny flakes or scales appear on the eyelids, which look like small flakes of dandruff. Crusts may develop at the base of eyelashes. • One or more of the tiny glands of the eyelids (meibomian glands) may block and fill with an oily fluid. COMPLICATIONS OF BLEPHARITIS: In most cases, blepharitis is uncomfortable but not serious or sight-threatening. Complications are uncommon, here are a few but please click the link below for more: • Stye. This is a painful infected swelling most prominent on the outside of the eyelid. It is due to an infection of the root (follicle) of an eyelash. Contact lens wearers may find their lenses feel uncomfortable when they have a flare-up of blepharitis. See your GP or an optometrist if you have a very painful stye that isn't getting better. If this happens, the stye may need to be drained. Changes to the eyelashes (which mainly occur in severe and long-standing cases). These include: • Loss of eyelashes (madarosis). • Misdirection of eyelashes towards the eye (trichiasis). • Loss of the colour of the eyelashes (poliosis). For more complications and what to do about them please visit: https://patient.info/health/blepharitis-leaflet https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/blepharitis/complications/ EYELID HYGEINE: Cleaning your eyelids to remove the crusts and scales from the eyelid margins and unblock the eyelid glands. To begin with you may need to clean your eyelids twice a day. In the long-term, you will need to clean them at least two or three times a week to prevent blepharitis from returning. Please always wash your hands before and after. Full detail in video but here is a summary: Warm Compress, The purpose of warmth is to soften the skin and any crusts attached to the eyelids. It also allows the oily secretions made by the meibomian glands to flow more freely, as warmth makes oils more runny. Therefore, warmth helps to unplug any blocked glands and allow the oily secretions to flow more readily. Warmth applied to the eyelids for five to ten minutes is sufficient to do this. Eyelid Massage, Massage the eyelids immediately after applying the warmth. Massaging helps to push out the oily fluid from the tiny meibomian glands. Cleaning The Eyelid, After warmth and massage, clean the eyelids. This can be done by any of the following ways. There is a lack of research studies to say which is the best method, but I prefer the traditional method. OMEGA 3 AND BLEPHARITIS: Omega 3 supplements have been shown to reduce the symptoms of blepharitis and eye dryness. They are not available on prescription, but you can buy them from a range of pharmacies and health food shops. Please leave a comment below and let us know if you have taken Omega 3 and found it helpful. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 63839 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Reduce High Blood Pressure Naturally | How To Prevent High Blood Pressure Naturally
 
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How To Reduce Blood Pressure | How To Prevent Blood Pressure | How To Lower High Blood Pressure | Lifestyle | Diet Hey, guys! This weeks video is about high blood pressure and how you can prevent getting it with simple yet effective lifestyle changes. Healthcare professionals refer to high blood pressure as the silent killer and for a good reason! High blood pressure increases risks of many diseases and shortens your life significantly. WHAT IS HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: Blood pressure is measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures: Systolic pressure – The pressure when your heart pushes blood out. Diastolic pressure – The pressure when your heart rests between beats. As a general guide: High blood pressure is considered to be 140/90mmHg or higher (or an average of 135/85mmHg at home) Ideal blood pressure is considered to be between 90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg Low blood pressure is considered to be 90/60mmHg or lower. A blood pressure reading between 120/80mmHg and 140/90mmHg could mean you're at risk of developing high blood pressure if you don't take steps to keep your blood pressure under control. HOW TO PREVENT HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE: High blood pressure can often be prevented or reduced by eating healthily, maintaining a healthy weight, taking regular exercise, drinking alcohol in moderation and not smoking. SALT & DIET: Cut down on the amount of salt in your food and eat plenty of fruit and vegetables. The NHS Eatwell Guide highlights the different types of food that make up our diet, and shows the proportions we should eat them in to have a well-balanced and healthy diet. Salt raises your blood pressure. The more salt you eat, the higher your blood pressure. Aim to eat less than 6g (0.2oz) of salt a day, which is about a teaspoonful. Eating a low-fat diet that includes lots of fibre – such as wholegrain rice, bread and pasta – and plenty of fruit and vegetables also helps lower blood pressure. Aim to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables every day. Eatwell guide link: https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/the-eatwell-guide.aspx ALCOHOL INTAKE: Regularly drinking alcohol above recommended limits can raise your blood pressure over time. Staying within these recommended levels is the best way to reduce your risk of developing high blood pressure: Men and women are advised not to regularly drink more than 14 units a week. Spread your drinking over three days or more if you drink as much as 14 units a week. Find out how many units are in your favourite drink and get tips on cutting down: https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/alcohol/Pages/alcohol-units.aspx GET ACTIVE & LOSE WEIGHT: Being active and taking regular exercise lowers blood pressure by keeping your heart and blood vessels in good condition. Regular exercise can also help you lose weight, which will also help lower your blood pressure. Adults should do at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity such as cycling or fast walking every week. CUT DOWN CAFFEINE: Drinking more than four cups of coffee a day may increase your blood pressure. If you're a big fan of coffee, tea or other caffeine-rich drinks, such as cola and some energy drinks, consider cutting down. STOP SMOKING: Smoking doesn't directly cause high blood pressure, but it puts you at much higher risk of a heart attack and stroke. Smoking, like high blood pressure, will cause your arteries to narrow. If you smoke and have high blood pressure, your arteries will narrow much more quickly, and your risk of heart or lung disease in the future is dramatically increased. SLEEP: Long-term sleep deprivation is associated with a rise in blood pressure and an increased risk of hypertension. It's a good idea to try to get at least six hours of sleep a night if you can. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 304818 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Use Eye Ointment | How To Apply Ointment To The Eyes | How To Administer An Eye Ointment
 
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How To Use Chloramphenicol Eye Ointment Properly | How To Apply Ointment To The Eyes Instructions | How To Administer An Eye Ointment Hey guys! This weeks video is all about how to use an eye ointments, I get asked how to use them by patients, probably on a daily basis when I'm in the pharmacy. Many patients find eye ointments tricky to use, it's thick and tends to curl like a little snake when it comes out of the tube. Don't be alarmed that your eye ointment doesn't look like mine in the video, the technique used is correct for all eye ointments. So here's my short guide, learn to use an eye ointment like a pro in just 2 minutes! As always please make sure to like, share and tag friends who use eye ointments or drops as they may learn something new. USING AN EYE OINTMENT 1- Wash your hands well before you use the eye ointment. 2- Sit or stand in front of a mirror. 3- Remove the cap from the tube. 4- Tilt your head back a little and pull the lower lid of your eye out to form a pocket. 5- Hold the tube upside down near to your eye. 6- Apply enough pressure to the tube to release a thin line of ointment along the inside of the lower eyelid. Try not to touch your eye as you do this. 7- Give the tube a little twist at the end to cut the ointment from the tube. 8- Close your eye for 30 seconds to 1 minute then blink a few times to spread the ointment around the inside of your eye. 9- Your vision may become a little blurred after you use an eye ointment. If you blink several times after you apply your eye ointment your vision should clear. Try not to rub your eyes. 10- Repeat the process in your other eye if directed by your healthcare professional. 11- When you have finished, remember to replace the cap on the tube in order to prevent the ointment from becoming contaminated. Try not to touch the top of the tube. SOME POINTS ABOUT EYE OINTMENTS Eye ointments are free from germs (sterile) before the bottle top is opened. Once it is opened: •Keep the tube closed in a cool, dark place (unless otherwise advised). • Do not let the top of the tube touch your eye, fingers, or any other surface. This is to keep it free from germs such as bacteria. • Do not let anyone else use your eye ointment and do not use anyone else's eye ointment yourself. • Throw out the tube (and get a new one if required) after the recommended time. This is often four weeks after first opening the tube - always check information leaflet for exact time frame. • Never keep opened tubes to use later. There is a risk that the ointment may become infected if it is kept and used for longer than advised. You may wish to write the date that you opened the tube on the label so you will know when it is time to throw it out. • Do not wear contact lenses whilst using eye ointments unless otherwise advised. (Some drugs and preservatives in eye ointments can accumulate in soft contact lenses and may cause harm.) USING OTHER EYE OINTMENTS OR DROPS If you need to use two eye ointments, you should apply one of the eye ointments as per the instructions above; then, wait about half an hour before you apply the second eye ointment. This is in order to allow enough time for the first eye ointment to be absorbed. If you have been prescribed an eye drop as well as an eye ointment you should normally apply the eye drop first. Wait five minutes and then apply your eye ointment Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 94138 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Prevent Gout Naturally | How To Prevent Gout Attacks Without Medication | Gout Flare Ups
 
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How To Prevent Gout Naturally | How To Prevent Gout Attacks Without Medication | Gout Flare Ups This weeks video idea came to me after a patient asked me what they can do, to help prevent gout attacks. Approximately 1 In 40 people In The UK Are Affected By Gout, Which Causes Sudden Attacks Of Severe Pain And Swelling In Joints. Here Are My 6 Top Tips To Help Prevent An Attack. Let's Help Those With Gout - Like, Share & Tag Friends Who Need This. Gout is in fact one of the most common forms of arthritis. We all know someone who suffers from gout so please help spread the word on this video so more people can learn how to prevent an attack. WHAT CAUSES GOUT Gout is caused by having too much of the chemical, uric acid, in your bloodstream. Uric acid is the waste product created when the body breaks down purines (a type of protein found in many foods and all of your cells). Most of the uric acid is passed out with the urine and some from the gut with the stools (faeces). In people with gout the amount of uric acid in the blood builds up. From time to time the level may become too high and tiny grit-like crystals of uric acid may form. The crystals typically collect in a joint. The crystals irritate the tissues in the joint to cause inflammation, swelling and pain - a gout attack. HOW TO PREVENT GOUT ATTACKS Lifestyle factors may reduce the risk of having gout attacks. These include losing weight (if overweight), eating a healthy diet and not drinking much alcohol or sugar-sweetened soft drinks. Feel free to watch my video for more detail. SIGNS & SYMPTOMS OF GOUT Any joint can be affected by gout, but it usually affects joints towards the ends of the limbs, such as the toes, ankles, knees and fingers. Signs and symptoms of gout include: • Severe pain in one or more joints • The joint feeling hot and very tender • Swelling in and around the affected joint • Red, shiny skin over the affected joint Symptoms develop rapidly over a few hours and typically last three to 10 days. After this time the pain should pass and the joint should return to normal. Almost everyone with gout will experience further attacks at some point, usually within a year. See your GP if you suspect you have gout and it hasn't been previously diagnosed, particularly if the pain keeps getting worse and you also have a high temperature (fever). It's important that a diagnosis is confirmed because other conditions that require urgent treatment, such as an infected joint, can sometimes cause similar symptoms. WATER AND HYDRATION VIDEO LINK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68PDhkXxAxw GOUT AND DIET GUIDE LINK: http://www.ukgoutsociety.org/PDFs/goutsociety-allaboutgoutanddiet-0917.pdf https://patient.info/health/gout-leaflet/features/gout-diet-sheet MEASURING ALCOHOL UNITS LINK: https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/alcohol/Pages/alcohol-units.aspx Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. Here are some related keywords for this video: • How to prevent gout • How to prevent gout attacks • How to prevent gout attacks naturally • How to prevent gout without medication • How to prevent gout attacks without medication • How to reduce gout attacks • Prevent gout attacks naturally • Prevent gout attacks naturally without medication • Prevent gout attacks naturally without medicine • Prevent gout flare ups • How to prevent gout flare ups • Prevent gout naturally • Prevent gout without medication • How to reduce gout flareups
Views: 21137 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Stop being Tired All The Time | How To Reduce Winter Tiredness | Best Way To Reduce Tiredness
 
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How To Reduce Winter Tiredness | Best Way To Reduce sleepiness | How To Stop being Tired All The Time | Beat Tiredness 1 in 5 people in the UK feel unusually tired. With winter approaching, so do the shorter days, leaving many of us feeling increasingly tired and in need of an energy boost. Here are my top 4 energy-giving tips to beat the winter tiredness! Tip 1 - Let in some sunlight As the days become shorter, your sleep and waking cycles may become disrupted. The lack of sunlight means your brain produces more of a hormone called melatonin, which makes you sleepy. Open your blinds or curtains as soon as you get up to let more sunlight into your home, and get outdoors in natural daylight as much as possible. Try to take even just a brief lunchtime walk, and make sure your work and home environments are as light and airy as possible. More light means less melatonin which means less tiredness/sleepiness. Tip 2 - Eat the right food Being overweight or underweight can affect your energy levels and leave you feeling sleepy. So it's important to make sure you eat a healthy, balanced diet. Once the summer ends, there's a temptation to ditch the salads and fill up on starchy foods such as pasta, potatoes and bread. However, you'll have more energy if you include plenty of fruit and vegetables in your comfort meals. Tip 3 - Take over the counter Vitamin D3 Between October to March you don't get enough Vitamin D from the sun, low Vitamin D levels can make you feel tired. So it’s a good idea to buy some over the counter vitamin D3 - I recommend taking 1000 units daily which is equivalent to 25 micrograms. It’s also reasonably inexpensive I pay £1.50 for a pack of 60 which will last me 2 months. I’ve also made 2 videos about vitamin D with much more information on it so feel free to check them out to learn more. What Is Vitamin D For? Where Does Vitamin D Come From What Does It Do? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TLroi--KfM About Vitamin D3 Colecalciferol https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfgzuG06Aqw Tip 4 - Get regular exercise Exercise may be the last thing you want to do when you're feeling tired on dark winter evenings. But you might be surprised by how energetic endorphins will make you feel after getting involved in some kind of physical activity every day. Exercise in the late afternoon may help to reduce early-evening fatigue and also improve your sleep. Try to reach the recommended goal of 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise a week. Do I have a health condition? While it's normal for all of us to slow down over winter, there are some medical conditions that could be causing your tiredness. Sometimes a lack of energy and enthusiasm (lethargy) can be a sign of winter depression. Known medically as seasonal affective disorder (SAD), it affects around 1 in 15 people, but it can be treated. Read more about how to recognise winter depression. https://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/Pages/winter-blues-SAD.aspx If your tiredness is stopping you from going about your normal life, or goes on for a long time, you should always talk to your GP. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. Here are some related keywords for this video: • How to reduce winter tiredness • How to stop being tired • How to beat tiredness • How to beat winter tiredness • Best way to reduce tiredness • Best way to reduce winter tiredness • How to reduce tiredness • How to reduce tiredness and sleepiness • How to stop being tired all the time • How to stop being tired in winter • How to stop being tired and sleepy • Best way to reduce sleepiness • Media pharmacist • How to stop winter tiredness • How to stop tiredness • Abraham the pharmacist
Views: 80582 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Get Rid of Acne | Best Spot Treatment | How To Use Benzoyl Peroxide | Prevent Acne (2018)
 
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How To Get Rid of Acne and Spots on Face | How To Stop Acne For Men and Women | Best Acne Treatment | How To Use Benzoyl Peroxide For Acne | How To Prevent Acne Spots | How To Stop Acne Breakouts | Acne Treatment UK Acne is a common skin condition that affects myself and most people at some point their lives. In this weeks video I've first given a short explanation of why we get acne followed by tips on skincare, treatment and what can make acne worse. Leave a comment below with how you get on and share any of your own useful tips which other may found helpful too! The most important thing to remember is that acne is treatable and can be improved. So if you have any friends or family who would benefit from this video then feel free to spread the word. Thank you. TYPE OF ACNE SPOTS: There are six main types of spot caused by acne, • Blackheads – small black bumps that develop on the skin; they're not filled with dirt, but are black because the inner lining of the hair follicle produces pigmentation. • Whiteheads – have a similar appearance to blackheads, but may be firmer and won't empty when squeezed. • Papules – small red bumps that may feel tender or sore. • Pustules – similar to papules, but have a white tip in the centre, caused by a build-up of pus. • Nodules – large hard lumps that build up beneath the surface of the skin and can be painful. • Cysts – the most severe type of spot caused by acne; they're large pus-filled lumps that look similar to boils and carry the greatest risk of causing permanent scarring WHAT CAN I DO IF I HAVE ACNE: These self-help techniques may be useful: • Don't wash affected areas of skin more than twice a day. Frequent washing can irritate the skin and make symptoms worse. • Wash the affected area with a mild soap or cleanser and lukewarm water. Very hot or cold water can make acne worse. • Don't try to "clean out" blackheads or squeeze spots. This can make them worse and cause permanent scarring. • Completely remove make-up before going to bed. • If dry skin is a problem, use a fragrance-free, water-based emollient. • Change your pillow case and face towel daily with a fresh laundered one. When not washed frequently, pillowcases and towels can contribute to acne breakouts because of the accumulation of bacteria, dirt, and oils. These come from the environment and from our own skin and hair from daily use. This small tip helped me a lot with my acne. Although acne can't be cured, it can be controlled with treatment that are available at pharmacies. WHEN TO SEEK MEDICAL ADVICE: Even mild cases of acne can cause distress. If your acne is making you feel very unhappy or you can't control your spots with over-the-counter medication, see your GP. Also see your GP if you develop nodules or cysts, as they need to be treated properly to avoid scarring. Try to resist the temptation to pick or squeeze the spots, as this can lead to permanent scarring. Treatments can take up to three months to work, so don't expect results overnight. HOW TO REDUCE SKIN IRRITATION OF BENZOYL PEROXIDE: If your skin does become irritated then stop using it until the irritation goes. Then try again with a lower strength, or reduce the time it is left on your skin before washing off. To prevent skin irritation, the following may help: • Most people can tolerate the 5% preparation but if it irritates then try the 2.5% once the irritation settles. If you wish to increase the strength, do it gradually. • Use a water-based preparation (rather than an alcohol-based one). • Apply once daily at first and wash off after several hours. • Gradually increase the length of time left on the skin. • Aim to put on twice daily when you get used to it. For more advice speak to your pharmacist. USEFUL LINK: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Acne Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT) I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 477540 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Swallow Tablets Easily | Best Easy Way Technique To Swallow Capsules | Difficulty Swallowing
 
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How To Swallow Tablets Easily | Best Easy Way Technique To Swallow Capsules | Difficulty Swallowing Medication. I was inspired to make this video after reading research that one in three people have difficulty swallowing tablets. Which then made me think of the times my patients had mentioned about having difficulty taking their capsules, pills and medication irrespective of how big they were sometimes. I hope this video helps anyone who finds its hard to swallow pills and if you know anyone who suffers from this please share it to them as they may find it useful. Here are some related tags to the video: • How to swallow tablets easily • How to swallow large tablets easily • How to swallow capsules easily • How to swallow large capsules easily • Easy way to swallow tablets • Easy way to swallow capsules • Easy way to swallow medication • Best way to swallow pills • Best way to swallow tablets • Best way to swallow capsules • Best technique to swallow tablets • Best technique to swallow pills • Difficulty swallowing tablets • Difficulty swallowing capsules • Difficulty swallowing pills Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 81002 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Take Metformin | How To Start Taking Metformin | How To Reduce Metformin Side Effects (2018)
 
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How To Take Metformin Without Side Effects | When Is The Best Time To Take Metformin | How To Build Up Metformin | Metformin 500mg Side Effects Constipation Diarrhea Hey guys! This weeks video is about metformin and the importance of slowly building up your dose to the prescribed dose to help reduce it's side effects when you're first started on it. Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. KEY FACTS: • Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. • It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. • The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. • Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). • Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. HOW AND WHEN TO TAKE: It's best to take metformin tablets with a meal to reduce the side effects. Swallow your metformin tablets whole with a glass of water. Do not chew them. Metformin tablets come in different strengths. Your doctor will tell you how many tablets to take a day. DIFFERENT TYPES OF METFORMIN: Metformin comes as 2 different types of tablet - standard-release tablets and slow-release tablets. Standard-release tablets release metformin into your body quickly. You may need to take them several times a day depending on your dose. Slow-release tablets dissolve slowly so you don't have to take them as often. Your doctor or pharmacist will explain what type of metformin tablets you are on and how to take them. Metformin is also available as a liquid for children and people who find it difficult to swallow tablets. Liquid metformin is called by the brand name Riomet. WILL MY DOSE GO UP OR DOWN: Your doctor will check your blood sugar levels regularly and may change your dose of metformin if necessary. When you first start taking metformin standard-release tablets you will be advised to increase the dose slowly. This reduces the chances of getting side effects. (See video for explanation on how to build up dose slowly) If you find you can't tolerate the side effects of standard-release metformin, your doctor may suggest switching to slow-release tablets. HOW TO COPE WITH SIDE EFFECTS: • Feeling sick - take metformin with food to reduce the chances of feeling sick - it may also help to slowly increase your dose over several weeks. • Diarrhoea or vomiting - have small but frequent sips of water. It may also help to take oral rehydration solutions which you can buy from a pharmacy or supermarket to prevent dehydration. Don't take any other medicines to treat diarrhoea or vomiting without speaking to a pharmacist or doctor. • Metallic taste in the mouth - if you find that metformin is giving you a metallic taste in the mouth, try chewing sugar-free gum. If you find you are suffering from side effects talk to your doctor about switching to a slow-release tablet. MORE INFORMATION ABOUT METFORMIN: Visit the following links to learn more about metformin and serious side effects or allergies which will need medical attention. https://beta.nhs.uk/medicines/metformin/ https://patient.info/medicine/metformin-for-diabetes Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 82540 AbrahamThePharmacist
Warfarin: Information About Warfarin | Warfarin Interactions | Warfarin Side Effects (2018) Coumadin
 
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Coumadin: Information About Coumadin For Patients | Coumadin Interactions | Coumadin Side Effects | Warfarin Patient Information | Warfarin Food Drug Interactions Hey guys! This weeks video is a short guide on warfarin also known as (coumadin). I see many patients on warfarin everyday and they are very knowledgable about their medicine, which is fantastic! But here's some information about warfarin, how it works, international normalised ratio (INR) and interactions which you may find useful. WHAT IS WARFARIN: Warfarin is the main oral anticoagulant used in the UK. An anticoagulant is a medicine that prevents blood clotting. Clotting (thickening) is a complex process involving a number of substances called clotting factors. Clotting factors are produced by the liver and help control bleeding. They work with cells that trigger the clotting process (platelets) to ensure blood clots effectively. Warfarin blocks one of the enzymes (proteins) that uses vitamin K to produce clotting factors. This disrupts the clotting process, making it take longer for the blood to clot. WHEN IS WARFARIN PRESCRIBED: Anticoagulant medicines, such as warfarin, are often prescribed for people who've had a condition caused by a blood clot or have an increased risk of developing harmful blood clots. TAKING WARFARIN: It's very important that you take warfarin exactly as directed. Don't increase your prescribed dose unless the doctor in charge of your care advises you to. Warfarin is taken once a day, usually in the evening. It's important to take your dose at the same time each day, before, during or after a meal. The aim of warfarin therapy is to decrease the blood's tendency to clot, but not stop it clotting completely. This means the dose of warfarin you're taking must be carefully monitored and, if necessary, adjusted. You'll have regular blood tests at your GP surgery or local anticoagulant clinic to make sure your dose is correct. The INR is a measure of how long it takes your blood to clot. When you start taking warfarin, you may be given a yellow booklet about anticoagulants, which explains your treatment. INTERACTIONS WITH WARFARIN Medicines Warfarin can interact with many other medicines, herbal medicines and supplements. Always ask your pharmacist, GP or staff at your anticoagulant clinic before you take them as they may interact with your warfarin. Also visit https://bnf.nice.org.uk/interaction/warfarin.html to check medication interactions. Foods and drink Foods containing large amounts of vitamin K include: • Green leafy vegetables, such as broccoli and spinach • Vegetable oils • Cereal grains • Small amounts of vitamin K can also be found in meat and dairy foods. When your first dose of warfarin is prescribed, it doesn't matter how much vitamin K you're eating because the dosage will be based on your current blood clotting levels. However, if you make significant changes to your diet, such as increasing your vitamin K intake or cutting out foods that contain vitamin K, it could interfere with how warfarin works. Consult the healthcare professional responsible for your care before making any significant changes to your diet while taking warfarin. Why you should avoid cranberry juice whilst taking warfarin is in the link lower down. Alcohol Getting drunk or binge drinking is dangerous while taking warfarin. It may increase the effect of the drug, increasing the risk of bleeding. See links below for more information. SIDE EFFECTS , WHEN TO SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION & MORE INFORMATION: Visit the following links, https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/warfarin/ https://patient.info/medicine/warfarin-an-anticoagulant ONLINE YELLOW BOOK LINK: http://www.npsa.nhs.uk/EasySiteWeb/GatewayLink.aspx?alId=19112 Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 8173 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Stop Acid Reflux | How To Treat Acid Reflux (2018)
 
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Heartburn a symptom of Acid reflux. This video is about treatment, causes, diet & foods to avoid to naturally stop acid reflux. Heartburn is a burning feeling in the chest caused by stomach acid travelling up towards the throat (acid reflux). If it keeps happening, it’s called gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Acid reflux is very common in fact 1 in 10 people get acid reflux almost every day! In this weeks video I’m going to give you some great tips that should really help. This video was sponsored by Dr Fox (Online Doctor & Pharmacy): https://www.doctorfox.co.uk MAIN SYMPTOMS OF ACID REFLUX: • Heartburn – a burning sensation in the middle of your chest an unpleasant sour taste in your mouth, caused by stomach acid You may also have: • Cough or hiccups that keep coming back • Hoarse voice • Bad breath • Wind, Bloating and feeling sick • Your symptoms will probably be worse after eating, when lying down and when bending over. TIPS THAT HELP WITH ACID REFLUX: • Eat smaller, more frequent meals • Raise one end of your bed 10 to 20cm by putting something under your bed or mattress – make it so your chest and head are above the level of your waist, so stomach acid doesn't travel up towards your throat • Try to lose weight if you're overweight • Try to find ways to relax • If you are a smoker stop smoking • Some foods and drinks may make reflux worse in some people, here is a link to a great acid reflux diet sheet which I mentioned in the video: https://patient.info/health/acid-reflux-and-oesophagitis/features/diet-sheet-for-oesophageal-reflux • Some medicines may make symptoms worse. They may irritate the oesophagus or relax the sphincter muscle and make acid reflux more likely. Tell your pharmacist if you suspect that a medicine is causing the symptoms, or making symptoms worse. • Posture. Lying down or bending forward a lot during the day encourages reflux. Sitting hunched or wearing tight belts may put extra pressure on the stomach, which may make any reflux worse. • Bedtime. If symptoms recur most nights, the following may help: Go to bed with an empty, dry stomach. To do this, don't eat in the last three hours before bedtime and don't drink in the last two hours before bedtime. If lifestyle changes and pharmacy medicines aren't helping then please see your GP. RED FLAGS: Any of the following red flags should prompt you to urgently see a GP: • Have heartburn most days for 3 weeks or more • Have other symptoms, like food getting stuck in your throat or difficulty swallowing • Are frequently being sick • Have unexplained weight loss • Have black or tarry stools • Have a gnawing, sharp or stabbing pain. • Feel like you have a lump in your stomach • Have bloody vomit or poo I have tried my best to add as many red flag symptoms but incase I have missed anything please make sure to visit the following pages as well, https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/heartburn-and-acid-reflux/ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/indigestion/ https://patient.info/health/acid-reflux-and-oesophagitis https://patient.info/health/acid-reflux-and-oesophagitis/features/diet-sheet-for-oesophageal-reflux https://patient.info/doctor/gastro-oesophageal-reflux-disease https://www.chemistanddruggist.co.uk/feature/ask-expert-indigestion-and-heartburn Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 246386 AbrahamThePharmacist
Pinworms | How To Get Rid of Pinworms | Threadworms Treatment (2019)
 
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Pinworms or Threadworms. This video is on Pinworm medicine, treatment, symptoms, home remedies to get rid of threadworms. Threadworms (Pinworms) are common but are not usually serious. Threadworms infect the gut and lay eggs around your anus which causes itch. Treatment usually includes medication plus hygiene measures. Medication kills the worms but not their eggs, which can survive for two weeks. Therefore, you also need strict hygiene measures for two weeks after taking medication to prevent you from swallowing eggs which may cause a new infection. All household members should be treated at the same time, including those without symptoms. HOW TO SPOT THREADWORMS (PINWORMS): Threadworms are small, thin, white, thread-like worms between 2 mm and 13 mm long. They infect human guts (intestines). Worms in kids are common but anyone of any age can be affected. Feel free to click the links below for images to help you spot them, https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/threadworms/ https://patient.info/health/itchy-bottom-pruritus-ani/threadworms ARE THREADWORMS (PINWORMS) HARMFUL: Not usually. Often, the worst thing about them is the itch and discomfort around the back passage (anus). This sometimes wakes children from sleep. Scratching may make the anus sore. Large numbers of threadworms may possibly cause mild tummy (abdominal) pains and make a child irritable. In girls, threadworms can wander forwards and lay their eggs in the vagina or urethra (the tube through which you pass urine). A doctor may check for threadworms in young girls with a vaginal discharge, bedwetting, or problems with passing urine. Rarely, threadworms can cause other problems such as loss of appetite and weight loss. THREADWORMS (PINWORMS) TREATMENT: You can buy medicine for threadworms from pharmacies. This is usually a chewable tablet or liquid you swallow called Mebendazole. Treat everyone in your household, even if they don't have symptoms. Always have a consultation with your pharmacist to make sure you’re suitable to take any medication and so they can also give you some useful tips. Tell the pharmacist if you need to treat a child under 2, or if you're pregnant or breastfeeding or get frequent recurrences of threadworms. Treatment might not be suitable and you may need to speak to your doctor. Mebendazole works by preventing the threadworms absorbing sugar so they should die within a few days. The medication is 90-100% effective but it doesn’t kill the eggs which is why strict hygiene measures are required. HYGIENE MEASURES: • Wash hands and scrub under fingernails – particularly before eating, after using the toilet or changing nappies • Encourage children to wash hands regularly • Bathe or shower every morning • Rinse toothbrushes before using them and keep them in the cupboard. • Keep fingernails short • Wash sleepwear, sheets, towels and soft toys (at normal temperature) • Disinfect kitchen and bathroom surfaces • Vacuum and dust with a damp cloth • Make sure children wear underwear at night – change it in the morning • Do not shake clothing or bedding, to prevent eggs landing on other surfaces • Do not share towels or flannels • Do not bite nails or suck thumbs and fingers HOW DO THREADWORMS (PINWORMS) SPREAD: Threadworms spread when their eggs are swallowed. They lay eggs around your anus, which make it itchy. The eggs get stuck on your fingers when you scratch. They can then pass on to anything you touch. Eggs can then pass to other people when they touch these surfaces and touch their mouth. They take around 2 weeks to hatch. Children can get worms again after they've been treated for them if they get the eggs in their mouth. This is why it's important to encourage children to wash their hands regularly. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/+AbrahamThePharmacist https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 14693 AbrahamThePharmacist
Athlete's Foot | How To Cure Athlete's Foot | Athlete's Foot Cream (2019)
 
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Athlete's foot cream. This video is on Athlete's Foot cure, spray, treatment, powder, symptoms and prevention. Athlete's foot (medically known as tinea pedis) is the common term for a skin infection of the feet or toes caused by a group of fungi called dermatophytes. They thrive in warm and moist environments such as changing rooms, showers, shoes and socks, so they are also happy living on your feet where conditions are similar. Athlete’s foot usually occurs between your toes, but it can also affect the soles and sides of your feet. ATHLETE'S FOOT SYMPTOMS: • Itchy and burning toes and feet • Scaly, very dry, cracked or peeling skin • Fissures/splits and softening and whitening of the skin between the toes • Cracking skin on the sole or heels • Blisters • Smelly feet For pictures of the symptoms please visit: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/athletes-foot/ ATHLETE'S FOOT TREATMENT: Athlete's foot can be treated locally with antifungal creams, sprays, liquids and powders that are available from your pharmacist without a prescription. Topical antifungals include Terbinafine, Miconazole and Clotrimazole. Treatment should be used as directed by your pharmacist and should be continued for two weeks after the symptoms have disappeared to ensure the infection has been treated effectively. WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR WITH ATHLETE'S FOOT: • Treatments from a pharmacy don't work • You're in a lot of discomfort • Your foot is red, hot and painful – this could be a more serious infection • You have diabetes – foot problems can be more serious if you have diabetes • You have a weakened immune system – for example, you have had an organ transplant or are having chemotherapy • If you are pregnant antifungal medication may not be suitable for you and you should make an appointment with your doctor to find out the best way to treat your athlete’s foot. PREVENT GETTING & SPREADING ATHLETE'S FOOT: There are really easy ways to avoid athlete's foot keeping your feet clean and dry is one of the most important prevention tips because fungi love warm and moist places. • There’s no point treating your feet from athlete's foot if you constantly re-infect them by putting them into damp, fungal infected footwear. So change them on a regular basis and don’t wear the same footwear every day have a few pairs of work shoes and gym trainers so you can rotate. • I have 3 pairs of work shoes that I rotate through during the weeks this is super important as it takes 24-48 hours for shoes to dry out properly so alternate and it will help. • If you really have to wear the same footwear day after day, let’s say you're on holiday. Then dry them out using a hair dryer on a cold setting, taking the insoles out can also help them dry quicker. • Another tip is to make sure your footwear isn’t too tight, if its too tight your toes are going to be squeezed together which encourages heat, sweating and fungus. So let the air circulate between the toes by getting wider footwear and not tying the laces too tight. • Flip flops wear them in the bathroom and in public showers, pools, hot tubs, changing rooms basically wherever you may walk barefoot. It’s going to ensure you don't shed skin around for others to pick up but also stop you picking up other species of fungus. Also never wear anyone else's footwear. • Always dry your feet carefully, especially between your toes. Also wear for cotton, silk or wool socks rather than synthetic ones so your feet sweat less and make sure to change them daily with fresh clean ones. With towels wash them frequently and don’t share them. • Athletes foot is very contagious so to prevent spreading follow these tips and don’t share clothes, shoes or socks. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/+AbrahamThePharmacist https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 28035 AbrahamThePharmacist
Urinary Tract Infection | How To Prevent UTI (2018)
 
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Urinary Tract Infection or UTI. This video is on causes, symptoms, tips to prevent avoid them naturally even when sexually active. Urinary Tract Infection or UTI for short. UTIs can affect different parts of your urinary tract, including your bladder (cystitis), urethra (urethritis) or kidneys (kidney infection). UTIs are a worldwide global issue with 8 billion doctor visits worldwide, it’s the number one bacterial infection. Women are 20 to 1 men likely have UTI. It’s all to do with the anatomy but we won’t go into that as this video is about helpful tips that can help prevent a UTI. This video was sponsored by Dr Fox (Online Doctor & Pharmacy): https://www.doctorfox.co.uk SYMPTOMS OF A UTI: • Needing to pee suddenly or more often than usual • Pain or a burning sensation when peeing • Smelly or cloudy pee • Blood in your pee • Pain in your lower tummy • Feeling tired and unwell • In older people, changes in behaviour such as severe confusion or agitation • UTI symptoms may be difficult to spot in people with dementia. TIPS THAT CAN HELP PREVENT A UTI: Tip 1- Try to drink plenty of water if you have a UTI as it can dilute the bacteria that’s in your bladder and urethra which is the tube that your pee comes out of. However if you have to take antibiotics don’t drink excessive amounts of water because you need the antibiotics to remain concentrated so it sticks around in the bladder and urethra where the infection is. Tip 2- Wipe from front to back when you go to the toilet. If you wipe from back to front bad bacteria that colonises the rectum like e.coli can get to the urethra and put you at risk of a UTI. Tip 3- If you keep getting urinary tract infections after sexual intercourse. Try emptying your bladder soon after sexual intercourse as it can help you prevent a UTI. Tip 4- Try to fully empty your bladder when you pee and also don’t hold your pee. When you have the urge go for a pee. Tip 5- Going for a shower instead of a bath can help. Also try wearing loose cotton underwear and avoid tight jeans, trousers and synthetic underwear like nylon. Tip 6 - Natural remedies: There is very little evidence that drinking cranberry juice or using probiotics reduces your chance of getting UTIs. SEE A GP IF: • You're a man with symptoms of a UTI • You're pregnant and have symptoms of a UTI • Your child has symptoms of a UTI • You're caring for someone elderly who may have a UTI • You haven't had a UTI before • You have blood in your pee • Your symptoms don't improve within a few days • Your symptoms come back after treatment • If you have symptoms of a sexually transmitted infection, you can also get treatment from a sexual health clinic. SEE A GP URGENTLY IF YOU HAVE: • Pain in your sides or lower back • A very high temperature or you feel hot and shivery • Felt sick or been sick • Diarrhoea These symptoms suggest a kidney infection, which can be serious if it isn't treated. I have tried my best to add as many symptoms which should prompt you to see a GP but incase I have missed anything please make sure to visit the following pages as well, https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/urinary-tract-infections-utis/ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cystitis/treatment/ https://patient.info/health/lower-urinary-tract-symptoms-in-women-luts/cystitis-urine-infection-in-women Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 91308 AbrahamThePharmacist
Iron Tablets | How To Take Iron Tablets | How To Reduce Iron Supplement Side Effects (2018)
 
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How To Take Iron Tablet Properly | How To Reduce Iron Tablet Side Effects | Iron Supplements For Best Absorption | Iron Vitamin C | Ferrous Sulphate Hey guys! This weeks video is about how to take an iron supplement so you can get the most out of it and how to reduce the side effects associated with them. Iron supplements are prescribed or recommended when when your anaemic or at risk of developing anaemia because the iron stores in your body are low. Symptoms of iron deficiency anaemia can include: • Tiredness and lack of energy • Shortness of breath • Noticeable heartbeats (heart palpitations) • Pale skin HOW TO TAKE YOUR IRON SUPPLEMENT: To help get the best absorption of your iron supplement you should take it on an empty stomach (preferably one hour before a meal or two hours after) with a drink containing vitamin C, such as a glass of orange juice or another juice drink with added vitamin C. Absorption of iron from the gut is reduced by food, tea and milk, so these should be avoided for one hour before and after taking the iron supplement. The precise instructions for when to take your supplements will be discussed with you by the healthcare professional who prescribes them. The only factor that improves the absorption of iron is vitamin C. This is why we recommend that you take your iron supplement with a drink containing vitamin C. HOW DO IRON SUPPLEMENTS WORK: Iron is needed for the production of haemoglobin, which is an essential ingredient in red blood cells. Haemoglobin is very important as it carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. If you don’t have enough iron, you can develop anaemia, which means that you aren’t making enough red blood cells to carry oxygen around your body. You may become breathless, tired and have a lack of energy, your skin may become pale and you may have palpitations (noticeable heartbeats). COMMON SIDE EFFECTS: The following side effects are common, • Stomach upset • Nausea (feeling sick) • Stomach ache • Diarrhoea • Constipation These usually improve as your body gets used to the iron supplements. If the side effects continue to be a problem for you, contact the healthcare professional who prescribed the iron supplements and discuss the possible options I have recommended in the video with them. Iron supplements can also make your stools look darker in colour. This is completely harmless. IRON SUPPLEMENT INTERACTIONS: Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking an iron supplement it is important that your doctor or pharmacist knows: • If you are taking any other medicines. This includes any medicines you are taking which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines. • If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine. Link to iron supplement interactions, this link is for ferrous sulphate a commonly prescribed iron supplement. If you are taking a different iron supplement, on the same page you can search the name of it and click interactions - https://bnf.nice.org.uk/interaction/ferrous-sulfate-2.html IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT ALL MEDICINES: Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else might have taken an overdose of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty. This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours. If you are having an operation or any dental treatment, tell the person carrying out the treatment which medicines you are taking. If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 34091 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Test Blood Sugar | How To Use Glucometer | How To Check Blood Glucose | (2018)
 
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How To Test Blood Sugar | How To Check Blood Glucose | How To Check Blood Sugar Levels | Blood Sugar Test Procedure | How To Check Sugar Level | Blood Sugar Test Procedure | How To Use Lancet | How To Use Glucose Meter Hey all, this weeks video is a thorough guide on how to test your blood sugar levels properly. I've also included some really useful tips which I believe everyone should know. Let me know how you get on with my guide by leaving a comment below. If you have any friends or family who would also benefit from this video then feel free to spread the word. Thanks for watching. BLOOD GLUCOSE TESTING: Blood glucose testing, also known as blood glucose monitoring, is one of the main tools involved in controlling diabetes. Not everyone with diabetes will test their blood glucose levels but it is regarded as being very beneficial for helping to make diet and medication dosing decisions. If you are on any medication that can lead to hypoglycaemia (most notably insulin), you should test your blood glucose levels. WHAT IS A LANCING DEVICE: Lancing devices are used to obtain samples of blood for glucose testing using a lancet. A variety of lancets are on the market, the most common of which are automatic lancing devices (Used in the video). TESTING BLOOD GLUCOSE METER & TESTS STRIPS: Control solutions are used to check that the meter and test strips are working together properly and that the test is performing correctly. Most control solutions last 90 days after opening, please check yours for the actual date. The acceptable range of glucose for that solution is listed on the back of your test strip vial or control solution. USEFUL TIPS: Please watch the full video for all of them but here are some important ones, • Use a new lancet every time you use your lancing device. I know it's time consuming but if you don't change, it's going to hurt more and you're at risk of a skin infection. • Diabetic patients tend to build a collection of different blood glucose meters over time. It’s really important that you only ever use one meter to build up a trend of results because different meters will give slightly different results. HOW TO TEST BLOOD GLUCOSE: • Prepare your kit for testing. • This should include: your meter, test strip, lancing device, cotton wool, monitoring diary and sharps bin. • Ensure that the lancing device is primed with a new lancet. • Wash and dry your hands - to ensure that the result is not influenced by any sugars that may be present on your fingers. • A fuller drop of blood will be obtained if your fingers are warm, so it’s worth warming your hands by washing with warm water and rubbing them for 10 seconds. • Put a test strip into your meter, make sure it switches on and is ready. • Prick your finger with the lancing device at the sides of the finger as there are less nerve ending here than at the tips or the ‘pads’. Switch fingers regularly to prevent thickening of the skin. You may want to avoid using your little finger due to the skin being thin. • If your hands are warmed up you shouldn't need to squeeze your finger for a blood drop, if necessary apply light pressure to the surrounding area until a blood drop appears. Squeezing too hard can interfere with results. • Wipe away the first blood drop with clean cotton wool and use the second blood drop for testing (careful not to smear the drop). • Gently touch the blood drop with the test strip in the meter, wait a few seconds for result to appear. • If the test is successful, clean any blood off your finger – with the cotton wool if necessary. • Record the result/details in a monitoring diary. • Dispose of the test strip and ensure that the lancet used is put into a sharps bin. If you have any further questions please speak to your pharmacist. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 60437 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Stop Snoring | How To Stop Storing Naturally | Snoring Exercises | 2018
 
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Complete guide on how to stop snoring naturally. I show tongue exercises that help stop snoring as well as useful tips for snoring. Hey everyone, this weeks video is about snoring and natural ways you can stop snoring. The idea came to me at 3am while I was in Malta last week with my friends. I didn't get much sleep that night as one of my friends is a heavy snorer and I wasn't aware of this until the first night. Hopefully this video will help him and many other people who snore around the world, feel free to share on to friends and family. Lastly a big thank you to David for helping me demonstrate the exercises. CAUSES OF SNORING: Snoring is caused by things such as your tongue, mouth, throat or airways in your nose vibrating as you breathe. It happens because these parts of your body relax and narrow when you're asleep. You're more likely to snore if you: • Are overweight • Smoke • Drink too much alcohol • Sleep on your back Sometimes it's caused by a condition like sleep apnoea, which is when your airways become temporarily blocked as you sleep. I've put more information about this below. OROPHARYNGEAL EXERCISES: A study done by Vanessa Ieto. Ph.D., of the Sleep Laboratory of the University of São Paulo in Brazil and her associates. Showed that eight minutes of oropharyngeal exercises performed three times a day for 3 months significantly reduced snoring. The study showed a decrease in frequency of loud snoring by 36% and the total power of snoring by 59% after 3 months of exercising. Here are the exercises, • Push tip of tongue against hard palate and slide tongue backward (20 times). • Suck entire tongue up against palate (20 times). • Force back of tongue against floor of mouth while touching tip of tongue to bottom incisors (20 times). • Elevation soft palate and uvula while intermittently saying “A” (20 times). • Place finger in mouth while pressing buccinator muscle outward (10 times per side). • Chew and deglutinate on both sides of mouth whenever eating. TIPS TO STOP SNORING: • Maintain a healthy weight and diet. Being overweight by just a few kilos can lead to snoring. Fatty tissue around your neck squeezes the airway and prevents air flowing in and out freely. •Try to sleep on your side rather than your back. While sleeping on your back, your tongue, chin and any excess fatty tissue under your chin can relax and squash your airway. Sleeping on your side prevents this. Try taping a tennis ball to the back of your sleepwear, or buy a special pillow or bed wedge to help keep you on your side. • Avoid alcohol before going to bed. Alcohol makes your muscles relax more than usual during a normal night's sleep. This may encourage the back of your throat to collapse as you breathe, which causes snoring. • Quit or cut down on smoking. Cigarette smoke irritates the lining of your nose and throat, causing swelling and catarrh. This means airflow is decreased and you're more likely to snore. • Keep your nose clear, so that you breathe in through your nose rather than your mouth. If an allergy is blocking your nose, try antihistamine tablets or a nasal spray. Ask your pharmacist for advice, or see your GP, if you're affected by an allergy or any other condition that affects your nose or breathing. • There are a range of stop-snoring treatments and devices on sale. These include nasal strips, which open the nostrils wider, throat sprays and devices known as mandibular advancement devices (MAD), which reposition the jaw to improve airflow. SLEEP APNOEA: If you feel sleepy during the day, or make gasping or choking noises while you sleep – please see your healthcare professional as you may have sleep apnoea, which can be serious if not treated. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. #howtostopsnoring #howtostopsnoringnaturally #snoringexercises
Views: 112331 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Use Nasal Spray | How To Use Nasal Spray Properly | Nasal Spray Technique (2018)
 
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How To Use A Nasal Spray | How To Use Nasal Spray Correctly | Proper Nasal Spray Technique | How To Use Decongestant Nasal Spray | How To Use Steroid Nasal Spray Hey all, this weeks video is my favourite video I've made so far! Let me know how you get on with my nasal spray guide by leaving a comment below. If you have any friends or family who would also benefit from this video then feel free to spread the word. Thanks for watching. WHAT ARE NASAL SPRAYS: Nasal sprays are a solution or suspension of medicine. They are sprayed into the nostrils, usually to produce a local effect directly inside the nose. Some nasal sprays are used to administer medicine that acts on other parts of the body. In these cases the medicine is absorbed into the bloodstream from the lining of the nose, which is rich in blood vessels. OTHER USEFUL INFORMATION: • Do not share nasal sprays with other people. • Decongestant nasal sprays should not be used for longer than 5-7 days, as this can cause the nasal congestion to come back (rebound congestion). • EXPIRY: never use your nasal spray after the expiry date as it may be contaminated with dirt or bacteria. Follow the printed instructions given with your spray. Write the date you open your nasal spray on the bottle so you know when to throw it away. • Always use the nasal spray according to the printed label or as instructed by your doctor or pharmacist. • Your nasal spray should be cleaned at least once a week, or more frequently if it becomes blocked. Follow the printed instructions supplied with the spray. • Inform your doctor or pharmacist if you accidentally take more than you were supposed to. • Nasal sprays are only intended for use in the nose and must not be taken by mouth. • Once you have finished the treatment course, carefully dispose of any leftover nasal spray, or return it to your pharmacist for disposal. • Always keep medicines out of the reach of children. If you have any further questions please speak to your pharmacist. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 84250 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Treat An Asthma Attack | What To Do During An Asthma Attack | Inhaler Treatment At Home
 
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How To Treat An Asthma Attack | What To Do During An Asthma Attack | Inhaler Treatment At Home | Emergency Asthma Attack Treatment The sad news is that asthma attacks kill three people in the UK each day. Every 10 seconds someone has a potentially life-threatening asthma attack. But many of these deaths could be avoided. Asthma attacks can be frightening, learning this useful knowledge about what to do during an asthma attack could potentially help save a life. If you think you're having an asthma attack, you should: • Sit down and try to take slow, steady breaths. Try to remain calm, as panicking will make things worse. • Take one puff of your reliever inhaler (usually blue salbutamol inhaler) every 30-60 seconds, up to a maximum of 10 puffs. It's best to use your spacer if you have one. • Call 999 (or emergency services number for your country) for an ambulance if you don't have your inhaler with you, you feel worse despite using your inhaler, you don't feel better after taking 10 puffs, or you're worried at any point. • If the ambulance hasn't arrived within 15 minutes, repeat step 2. For more information on what to do during an asthma attack visit: https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/asthma/Pages/Asthmaattacks.aspx https://www.asthma.org.uk/advice/asthma-attacks/ https://www.asthma.org.uk/advice/child/asthma-attacks/ Asthma helpline numbers: NHS 111 - Dial 111 Asthma UK - Speak to an asthma nurse specialist Dial 0300 222 5800 After an asthma attack: You should see your GP or asthma nurse within 48 hours of leaving hospital, or within 24 hours if you didn't need hospital treatment. One in six people treated in hospital for an asthma attack need hospital care again within two weeks, so it's important to discuss how you can reduce your risk of future attacks. Talk to your doctor or nurse about any changes that may need to be made to manage your condition safely. Ask your GP, asthma nurse or pharmacist to show you how to use all your inhalers correctly. Although study results vary, estimates of inhaler errors include up to 90% of patients using pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) and up to 54% of patients using dry powder inhalers. Inadequate inhaler technique lowers drug deposition to the lungs, wastes medication and may lead to poor disease control and increased emergency hospital admissions. Here are some related keywords for this video: • How to treat asthma attack • Asthma attack treatment • Asthma attack treatment at home • What to do when someone has an asthma attack • What to do during an asthma attack • Treating an asthma attack • Asthma attack inhaler • How to treat an asthma attack at home • How to treat an asthma attack with an inhaler • How to use inhaler in an asthma attack • How to use inhaler during an asthma attack • How to use inhaler to treat an asthma attack • Emergency asthma attack treatment • Asthma attack Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 15822 AbrahamThePharmacist
Standing Desk | What Are The Standing Desk Health Benefits (2018)
 
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Standing desk. This video is on health benefits, scientific studies and review of stand up desk, sit stand desk or standing desk. Standing desks, are they the future? Are there actually any health benefits to using them? In this weeks video I've been looking at the research and studies done on the potential health benefits of using a standing desk. I've also been using a standing desk since September 2018 so I can give you my own review and thoughts. If you’re a regular viewer of my videos you'll know I’m always transparent about everything in my videos. I want a standing desk have been kind enough to send me their EIGER pro standing desk to use, but they have had no input or influence on this piece. If you'd like to know more about I want a standing desk and their products here is a link to their website: https://iwantastandingdesk.com SITTING TOO MUCH: While spending eight hours a day plonked on your cheeks sounds like joy to some, it doesn't do great things for your health. Research from the NHS found that, compared to the shortest time spent sedentary, the longest time spent sedentary was associated with a: • 112% increase in risk of type 2 diabetes. • 147% increase in cardiovascular events. • 90% increase in death due to cardiovascular events. • 49% increase in death due to any cause. And it only gets worse with age. A University of Edinburgh study suggests 45- to 54-year-olds spend more time sitting down than pensioners - 7.8 hours compared to 7.4 hours of sedentary time for the over-75s. EXPERT GUIDANCE: In June 2015 the British journal of sports medicine released the first guidance on curbing health risks of a sedentary lifestyle calling for sit-stand desks and regular walks. The guidance suggests that office workers should be on their feet for a minimum of 2 hours a day during working hours but this should eventually be increased up to 4 hours a day. This doesn’t mean stand up for 4 hours in one go but instead break up prolonged periods of sitting with the use of sit stand desks, standing based work and regular walks. Here is a link to the article feel free to read it for the full information as there are some limitations to the study which are mentioned towards the end of the NHS article: https://www.nhs.uk/news/lifestyle-and-exercise/office-workers-of-england-stand-up-for-your-health/ https://www.bmj.com/company/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/COI.pdf STANDING DESK STUDY: Now let’s move onto a very interesting recent cluster two arm randomised controlled trial from October 2018 which was actually done on a 146 NHS office workers over a 12 month period. The study found that providing the NHS office workers with adjustable desks that allowed them to sit or stand led to a reduction in daily sitting time of an hour! The study also found that workers provided with adjustable desks reported better job performance, reduced sickness at work, less anxiety and an improved quality of life. However the size of the study means we can’t be sure of the accuracy of these outcomes. Here is a link to the article feel free to read it for the full information as there are some limitations to the study which are mentioned towards the end of the NHS article: https://www.nhs.uk/news/lifestyle-and-exercise/adjustable-desks-could-improve-work-performance-reducing-sitting-time/ https://www.bmj.com/content/363/bmj.k3870 MY REVIEW & THOUGHTS: I can sometimes easily spend 4-8 hours editing longer duration videos which we make for various companies. And I've actually really enjoyed mixing it up between sitting and standing especially when I begin to get feel achy from sitting too long. I’d say the main thing to acclimatise to was what you do with your feet. I’d also recommend that you wear comfortable slippers or footwear as it can really help. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 7334 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Treat A Fever In Adults | How To Get Rid Of A Fever In Children | Bring Down A Fever In Baby
 
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How To Bring Down A Fever In Children | How To Get Rid Of A High Fever In Adults | How To Treat A High Fever In Babies Hey guys! This weeks video is all about how to treat a fever in adults, children and babies. WHAT IS NORMAL? The average body temperature, taken with a thermometer in the mouth, is 37ºC (98.6ºF), but anywhere between 36.5ºC and 37.2ºC (97.7ºF and 99ºF) can be considered normal. WHAT IS A FEVER? A fever helps the body fight infections by stimulating the immune system. By increasing the body’s temperature, a fever makes it more difficult for the bacteria and viruses that cause infections to survive. A fever is a high temperature of 38C or more. RED FLAG SYMPTOMS TO BE AWARE OF: Any of the following symptoms suggest that you or your child need urgent medical advice/help. They suggest that the symptoms could indicate a serious illness, and need emergency help. I have tried my best to add as many red flag symptoms but incase I have missed anything please make sure to visit the following pages as well, -https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/treating-high-temperature-children/? -https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/spotting-signs-serious-illness/? -https://patient.info/health/fever-in-children-high-temperature/seeing-a-doctor -https://beta.nhs.uk/symptoms/fever-in-children/ • A high temperature in a baby less than 8 weeks old • The child is under 3 months old with a temperature of 38°C (101°F) or above • The child is between 3 and 6 months with a temperature of 39°C (102°F) or above • The child's fever lasts for more than 5 days • Your child's health is getting worse • Your child is under 8 weeks old and doesn't want to feed • Cold feet and hands • A high-pitched, weak or continuous cry in young children • A lack of responsiveness, slower in activity or floppy, quiet or listless despite taking paracetamol or ibuprofen • A bulging fontanelle (the soft spot on a baby’s head) • A stiff neck • Bothered by light • Not drinking for more than 8 hours or showing signs of dehydration -https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/dehydration/ • Fits, convulsions or seizures • Blue, very pale, mottled, blotchy or ashen/grey skin • Difficulty breathing, fast breathing, grunting while breathing, or if your child seems to be struggling to breathe - for example, sucking their stomach in under their ribs • Unusually drowsy, hard to wake up, unable to stay awake, doesn’t seem to recognise you or seem aware of what’s going on around them • Severe abdominal pain • A spotty purple-red rash anywhere on the body that doesn’t fade when a glass is rolled over it • Repeated vomiting or green (bile-stained) sick • You have any concerns about looking after your child at home TIPS TO HELP A FEVER: • Drink or encourage to drink plenty of fluids – offer regular breastfeeds if you're breastfeeding. • Try to eat nutritious foods if you can. • Check on your child from time to time during the night • Tepid sponging is not recommended for treatment of fever • Avoid bundling up in too many clothes or bedclothes • Keep the room at a comfortable temperature, but make sure fresh air is circulating • Drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration MEDICATION: If your child seems distressed, consider giving them children's paracetamol or ibuprofen. These shouldn't be given together unless advised by a healthcare professional. Adults can take paracetamol and/or ibuprofen to help reduce a fever. Always check any medication with your healthcare professional, read the instructions on the bottle or packet carefully, and never exceed the recommended dose. Do not use ibuprofen if you have a known allergy or asthma attacks have been triggered by it or medicines in the same family. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 62176 AbrahamThePharmacist
Dandruff | How To Get Rid Of Dandruff (2018)
 
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Dandruff treatment. This video is on treatment, causes and shampoo to get rid of dandruff permanently and fast at home. Dandruff is a common skin condition that causes white or grey flakes of skin to appear on the scalp and in the hair. The flakes are often noticeable if they fall from your scalp on to your shoulders. I've received a lot of messages to make a video on dandruff and how to treat it. Some of the messages were quite upsetting to read as dandruff had resulted in bullying and verbal abuse directed at the sufferer. I just want to say if you suffer with dandruff which many people do it doesn’t result from poor hygiene, it's not contagious and it's a natural process. So if anyone says anything to you, don’t let it get to you, remain positive and keep on being amazing. Hope my tips help! DANDRUFF CAUSE: Dandruff is, perhaps surprisingly, mainly caused by a fungus which most of us have living naturally on our skin, but which causes problems in about half of us. A third of sufferers have apparently avoided a social occasion because of the embarrassment it causes! But fear not – there are some ways to combat it. The fungus that is the principal cause of dandruff is called Malassezia globosa, and it feeds off the oils on our skin and hair. But when it does so, it produces oleic acid, which can irritate our skin. In some people, this sets off an immune response which can lead to a rapid turnover of skin cells. Air pollution can make this response worse, whilst UV light from sunshine can help dampen it down. DANDRUFF TREATMENT: Adding oil to your scalp is no good at all – washing off the natural oils that Malassezia feeds on is more likely to help. However, there are some chemicals that can help kill it off too. The most effective anti-fungals are Miconazole and Ketoconazole. Ketoconazole is found in some shampoos, but Miconazole is currently only available in skin creams so it won't be helpful for treating dandruff. You may find, though, that the effects of an anti fungal shampoo wear off after a while, so you might need to cycle some alternatives. • Coal tar shampoos can slow down skin turnover (although they may discolour fair hair). • Shampoos containing salicylic acid can help get rid of the flakes. • Shampoos containing zinc or selenium can also target the fungus, so there are a wide range of solutions to try. Researchers have now sequenced the genetic code of Malassezia and are working on more specific targeted drugs to kill it – a group of drugs known as sulfonamides work against it, but nothing containing them is yet available for dandruff. Make sure you read the instructions that come with the shampoo before using it to check if it's suitable for you and see how often it should be applied. A pharmacist can offer advice if you need it. It's particularly important to leave the shampoo in your hair for at least five minutes before washing it out. Try these shampoos for a month to see if your dandruff improves. You might need to try more than one type to find one that works for you. You may be able to use the shampoo less often once your symptoms improve, but your dandruff will probably come back if you stop using it completely. WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR: You don't usually need to see your GP if you have dandruff, but it's a good idea to visit them if: • You've tried anti-dandruff shampoos for at least a month and your symptoms haven't improved • Your dandruff is very severe or your scalp is very itchy • Your scalp is red or swollen • You have a weakened immune system – for example, you're having chemotherapy, you have HIV, or you're taking medication that suppresses your immune system Your GP can examine your scalp to check for skin conditions that could be causing your dandruff. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 446753 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Use Eye Drops (2018)
 
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Eye drops made easy with this weeks video. Learn to put in or apply eye drops yourself with my administration guidelines. Eye drops are not the easiest of medicines to administer, especially when you are doing it yourself. In this weeks video I show you my favourite wrist-knuckle technique for applying an eye drop and also give some pro tips that everyone should know. This video was sponsored by Dr Fox (Online Doctor & Pharmacy): https://www.doctorfox.co.uk WRIST-KNUCKLE TECHNIQUE: 1. Check the expiry date on your eye drop bottle, and shake if required. 2. Wash your hands before opening the bottle. 3. Lie down or sit down and tilt your head back. 4. Make a fist with one hand and use your knuckles to pull your lower eyelid downwards. Place your other hand with the eye drop bottle onto your knuckles (see video). 5. Look up and squeeze one drop into your lower eyelid, making sure the nozzle does not touch your eye, eyelashes or eyelid. 6. Close your eye and press gently on the inner corner of your eye (punctum hold) for 1-2 minutes to ensure the drop is fully absorbed. TOP TIPS WHEN USING EYE DROPS: • Wash your hands and shake the bottle (if advised on the information leaflet) before use. • Never share your eye drops with anyone else. • Store them as instructed, whether that is at room temperature (never near a radiator) or in the fridge. • Use your drops only within the expiry date on the bottle, and within the expiry once opened. This is usually 28 days once the bottle is open, but can vary for different eye drop bottles, so always check to ensure they are safe to use. This is to ensure they are not contaminated or have become less effective. It is a good idea to write the date that you open the bottle and the future expiry onto the label so you know when it will expire. • Some of the single dose unit drops may be packaged within a sachet or pouch inside the box, and when the seal is open, all the drops within the sachet/pouch have a limited expiry date, for example seven days. Look at the leaflet that comes with your drops or check with your pharmacist to be sure you know the correct expiry once opened • Order further supplies from your GP before your bottle has finished. This will ensure that you do not run out of drops. • Use your eye drops at the same time each day, and as evenly spaced out throughout the day as possible. • Only administer the number of drops advised by your clinician. • If you are using more than one type of drop in the same eye, remember to leave a five minute gap between drops to allow the first drop to be absorbed. Otherwise, the second drop will wash the first drop out, causing it to have been ineffective. • If you are using an eye ointment at the same time as your eye drops, always use your eye drops first and leave a five minute gap before using the ointment. • If you are having difficulty opening your drop container or bottle, or having difficulty squeezing a drop into your eye, speak to your pharmacist as they can recommend useful administration aids that can help. • If you use contact lenses, never put a drop in your eye whilst wearing a lens unless advised by your clinician and allow 15 minutes after using your drops before inserting a lens. Contact lens wearers should avoid using eye drops which contain preservatives. Please speak to your doctor or pharmacist about alternative preservative free eye drops. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 23759 AbrahamThePharmacist
Motion Sickness Treatment | How To Stop Motion Sickness
 
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Motion sickness or travel sickness is feeling sick when you travel by car, boat, plane or train. This weeks video is about the symptoms, causes, remedies and medicines (pills, tablets) to treat motion sickness. Motion sickness (travel sickness) is common, especially in children. It is caused by repeated unusual movements during travelling, which send strong (sometimes confusing) signals to the balance and position sensors in the brain. I've always suffered from motion sickness since a young age and like most people I really don't like it. Thankfully I now know what to do and I'm going to share that knowledge with you in this weeks video. This video was sponsored by Dr Fox (Online Doctor & Pharmacy): https://www.doctorfox.co.uk SYMPTOMS OF MOTION SICKNESS: • Feeling sick (nausea) • Sweating • Increase in saliva • Headaches • Feeling cold and going pale • Feeling weak HOW TO PREVENT MOTION SICKNESS: Prepare for your journey • Don't eat a heavy meal before travelling. • On long journeys, try breaking the journey to have some fresh air, drink some cold water and, if possible, take a short walk. Where you sit • Keep motion to a minimum. For example, sit in the front of a car, over the wing of a plane, or on deck in the middle of a boat. • On a boat, stay on deck and avoid the cafeteria or sitting where your can smell the engines. Breathing and smell • Breathe fresh air if possible. For example, open a car window. • Avoid strong smells, particularly petrol and diesel fumes. This may mean closing the window and turning on the air conditioning, or avoiding the engine area in a boat. Using your eyes and ears differently • Close your eyes (and keep them closed for the whole journey). This reduces 'positional' signals from your eyes to your brain and reduces the confusion. • Try listening to an audio book with your eyes closed. There is some evidence that distracting your brain with audio signals can reduce your sensitivity to the motion signals. • Try to sleep - this works mainly because your eyes are closed, but it is possible that your brain is able to ignore some motion signals when you are asleep. • Do not read or watch a film. • It is advisable not to watch moving objects such as waves or other cars. Instead, look ahead, a little above the horizon, at a fixed place. OVER THE COUNTER MEDICINES Always speak to your pharmacist they will be able to recommend the best treatment for you or your child. Medicines are best taken before the journey. They may still help even if you take them after symptoms have begun, although once you feel sick you won't absorb medicines from the stomach very well. Some medicines used for motion sickness may cause drowsiness. Some people are extremely sensitive to this and may find that they are so drowsy that they can't function properly at all. Always speak to your pharmacist and read the information leaflet. Hyoscine is usually the most effective over the counter medicine for motion sickness. It works by preventing the confusing nerve messages going to your brain. There are several brands of medicines which contain hyoscine - they come in a tablet, patch and soluble form for children. Certain antihistamines can also be useful, although they are not quite as effective as hyoscine for motion type sickness. However, they usually cause fewer side-effects for example, cinnarizine. WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR: There are a number of anti-sickness medicines which can only be prescribed by your healthcare professional. Let them know what you’ve tired as finding what medicine works best can sometimes be a case of trial and error. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 47136 AbrahamThePharmacist
Prevent DVT On Long Flights | Exercises To Prevent DVT | DVT Flight Socks | Reduce DVT Risk (2018)
 
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How To Prevent DVT On Long Flights | Best Exercises To Reduce Risk Of DVT | Prevent Blood Clots When Flying | Compression Stockings For Deep Vein Thrombosis | Flight Length Hey guys! This weeks video is about how you can prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) when traveling long distance. It's a question I get asked quite often in the pharmacy so I hope this video helps everyone. Video Sections: 0:08 - Facts About Air Travel 0:30 - Facts About DVT 1:06 - About Compression Socks 2:32 - Flight Exercises & Tips 3:40 - Summary & Important Information 4:39 - Bloopers WHAT IS A DVT? A DVT is a blood clot that forms in a deep vein, usually in the leg. The deep veins in the leg are blood vessels which go through the calf and thigh muscles, and are not those which you can see just below the skin. WHAT IS TRAVEL-RELATED DVT? Long journeys (more than four hours) by plane, train, bus, car, etc, are thought to cause a slightly increased risk of DVT. This is probably due to sitting immobile and cramped for long periods. Blood flows more slowly, and collects in the legs when they are hanging down. Blood flowing slowly is more likely to make a clot. The risk of DVT from travel is small. Research studies suggest that there is about one DVT for every 4,656 flights that last for four hours or more. The longer the flight, the more likely you are to develop a DVT. It has to be stressed that the vast majority of travellers have no problems. Other risk factors are involved, so for most people the chance of developing a DVT just from a long journey is very small. CONDITIONS THAT MAY INCREASE RISK OF DVT ON FLIGHTS OF 8HOURS OR MORE: • History of DVT or pulmonary embolism • Cancer • Stroke • Heart disease • Inherited tendency to clot (thrombophilia) • Recent surgery – pelvic region or legs • Obesity • Pregnancy • Hormone replacement therapy For up to date list visit: https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/travelhealth/Pages/PreventingDVT.aspx If you or a family member falls in any of the above categories visit your GP before travelling. EXERCISE & TIPS TO REDUCE DVT ON FLIGHTS: Whilst travelling on a long journey, particularly on a long-haul plane trip: Exercise your calf and foot muscles regularly: • Every half hour or so, bend and straighten your legs, feet and toes when you are seated. • Press the balls of your feet down hard against the floor or foot rest every so often. This helps to increase the blood flow in your legs. • Take a walk up and down the aisle every hour or so, when the seatbelt signs are not switched on. • Make sure you have as much space as possible in front of you for your legs to move. So avoid having bags under the seat in front of you and recline your seat where possible. • Take all opportunities to get up to stretch your legs, when there are stops in your journey. • Drink normal amounts of fluid to avoid a lack of fluid in the body (dehydration). • Do not drink too much alcohol. (Alcohol can cause dehydration and immobility.) • Do not take sleeping tablets, which cause immobility. ELASTICATED COMPRESSION STOCKINGS: There is some evidence to suggest that compression stockings can help to prevent travel-related DVT in people who have a high to moderate risk.The slight pressure from the stocking helps to prevent blood 'pooling' in the calf. Stockings do not replace the need for regular exercises. Full guidance on these in video. SIGNS & SYMPTOMS OF DVT & PULMONARY EMBOLISM: Please visit the following link for more information on this - https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dvt/travel.html Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT) I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 7874 AbrahamThePharmacist
Drug Interactions | 5 Tips You Should Do To Avoid Them
 
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Drug or medication interactions can happen to anyone taking medicines. This weeks video is about why drugs interact and avoiding them. All my patients seem to know the rule about not drinking when you're on antibiotics - the trouble is, it isn't a rule! In fact, it's safe to drink some alcohol when you're taking most kinds of antibiotics (the antibiotic you should never drink with is metronidazole, also known as Flagyl®). Yet there are many possible interactions between commonly prescribed medicines with other medicines, supplements and even food that very few people seem to have heard of. So this weeks video will explain why they happen, and what everyone should do to avoid them. This video was sponsored by Dr Fox (Online Doctor & Pharmacy): https://www.doctorfox.co.uk HOW TO MINIMISE THE RISK OF INTERACTIONS: It isn't realistic to expect patients to memorise every possible interaction for every medication. But the following tips can go a long way in reducing problems: 1. Know why you are taking each medication Drug names are often hard to pronounce, difficult to remember, and easy to mix up. An error when you list your drugs could mean a potential interaction will go unnoticed. However, if you tell a health care professional that you're taking a medication followed by why you take it, he or she is more likely to realise what medication you take. 2. Know how to take the drug It's important to learn whether to take your medication with food, on an empty stomach or to avoid certain types of food at the same time you take the medication. If you’re not taking the medication correctly it can reduce the absorption and effectiveness or even cause irritation of your stomach lining. 3. Pharmacies don't have access to your medical records Let your pharmacy know all the medication you take. Pharmacies don’t have access to your medical records when dispensing. So if you’ve been started on any new medication let the pharmacist know when they give you your medication. They can then give you any useful tips that will help you get the most out of your medicines 4. Supplements, herbal remedies and over the counter medicines also interact with medication. Some of the most serious drug interactions involve prescription medications and supplements or herbal remedies. If you're purchasing these then it's likely that your healthcare professional will not be aware you are taking them. Always include these in your medication list when giving a medication history. 5. Talk to your pharmacist I always ask patients to bring in all their medicines, so either a list or actually bring them into the pharmacy. This includes the prescribed medicines, over the counter medicines, supplements, herbal remedies, creams....basically everything. Your pharmacist can then sit down with you, look at them and identify any potential interactions between them. They can then give you the best advice to get the most out of your medication. 6. Alcohol and its interaction with medication Whether you can drink alcohol while on medication depends entirely on what medication you’ve been prescribed. The following link has some really useful detailed information which I'd highly recommend everyone to read. https://www.drinkaware.co.uk/alcohol-facts/health-effects-of-alcohol/lifestyle/is-it-ok-to-drink-while-on-medication/ LINK REFERENCES IN VIDEO: To check interactions between medicines: https://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.html To find out more information about a medicine or its patient information leaflet: https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 12103 AbrahamThePharmacist
Diabetes Signs and Symptoms (2018)
 
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Do I Have Diabetes | Signs Of Diabetes | Diabetes Symptoms In Men & Women | Early Signs Of Diabetes | Early Warning Signs Of Diabetes Hey guys! This weeks video is about the signs of diabetes. Having some of the signs of diabetes doesn’t mean you definitely have the condition, but you should always contact your GP, just to make sure. Type 2 diabetes can cause serious long-term health problems. It can be easy to miss as it develops slowly, especially in the early stages when it can be harder to spot the symptoms. If left untreated diabetes affects many major organs, including your heart, blood vessels, nerves, eyes and kidneys. Being diagnosed early and controlling your blood sugar levels can help prevent these complications. COMMON SYMPTOMS OF DIABETES: • Urinating more often than usual, particularly at night • Feeling very thirsty • Feeling very tired • Unexplained weight loss • Itching around the penis or vagina, or frequent episodes of thrush • Cuts or wounds that heal slowly • Blurred vision – caused by the lens of the eye becoming dry WHY DO WE GET THESE SYMPTOMS IN DIABETES: These symptoms occur because some or all of the glucose stays in the blood, and isn’t being used as fuel for energy. The body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by flushing the excess glucose out of the body in the urine. High levels of glucose being passed in the urine are a perfect breeding ground for the fungal infection which causes thrush. RISK FACTORS FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES: Three of the main risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes are: Age – Being over the age of 40 (over 25 for people of south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or black African origin, even if you were born in the UK). Genetics – Having a close relative with the condition, such as a parent, brother or sister. Weight – Being overweight or obese. More information at: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/type-2-diabetes/causes/ SYMPTOMS OF FUNGAL THRUSH INFECTIONS: Thrush is a yeast infection (candida albicans) which tends to affect warm, moist areas of the body such as the vagina, penis, mouth and certain areas of skin. Thrush is more common in people with diabetes as high sugar levels lead to better conditions for the yeast to grow. Vaginal thrush (vulvovaginal candidiasis) symptoms include: • Soreness and irritation • White curd appearance on the skin • Pain during sexual intercourse • White vaginal discharge • Reddening of the vulva (the outer parts of the vagina) • Itching around the vagina (infectious vaginitis) Oral thrush (oral candidiasis) symptoms include: • A nasty or bitter taste • Redness or bleeding inside the mouth • Creamy white coloured patches (lesions) in the mouth (cheeks, lips, tongue or the back of the mouth) • Painful and sore mouth (can include the throat) • Cracks at the corners of the lips (angular cheilitis) Thrush in men (candida balanitis) Symptoms of thrush in men include: • Reddening or swelling or soreness of the glans (head) of the penis • Itching around the tip of the penis • Discharge beneath the foreskin • Nasty odour • Pain during urination • White curd-like appearance on the skin • Painful experience during sex PREVENTING TYPE 2 DIABETES: If you're at risk of type 2 diabetes, you may be able to prevent it developing by making lifestyle changes: • Eating a healthy, balanced diet • Losing weight if you're overweight, and maintaining a healthy weight • Stopping smoking if you smoke • Drinking alcohol in moderation • Taking plenty of regular exercise For more information please visit the following links: https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Diabetes/Pages/Avoiddiabetes.aspx https://www.diabetes.org.uk/preventing-type-2-diabetes/can-diabetes-be-prevented Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 31621 AbrahamThePharmacist
How Much Bacteria Is On Your Phone | LAB EXPERIMENT REVEALED | How To Disinfect Phone | 2018
 
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Bacteria On Phone | How To Clean Bacteria From Phone | Germs On Mobile Phone | How Dirty Is Your Phone | Disinfect Cell Phone Hey all, in this weeks video we visited Dr Isreb at the University of Bradford School of Pharmacy to see what bacteria are on my phone, toilet seat and skin! Watch the full video to see what we found... Let’s admit it, in this day and age, we go everywhere with our smartphone. It is our friend, philosopher, guide and so much more! We practically live with it 24×7 but how many times do we clean it? Our phone is perhaps one of our dirtiest possessions with bacteria all over it. Research has varied on just how many germs are crawling on the average cell phone, but a recent study found more than 17,000 bacterial gene copies on the phones of high school students. Scientists at the University of Arizona have found that cell phones carry 10 times more bacteria than most toilet seats. SHOULD WE BE WORRIED? Human skin is naturally covered in microbes that don’t usually have any negative health consequences, and that natural bacteria, plus the oils on your hands, get passed on to your phone every time you check a text or send an email. It follows that most of the organisms found on phones are not pathogens that will make you sick. Normally I'm not so anti-bacteria, I don't believe that we should be killing bacteria all the time as there are such things as good bacteria but in this case sanitise your hands and your phone. But some bacteria should concern you which you can get from simply touching an unclean surface and then transferring it to your phone. Studies have found serious pathogens on phones, including Streptococcus, MRSA and even E. coli. Just having these microbes on your phone won’t automatically make you sick, but you still don’t want to let them enter your system or someone who has a weekended immune system. Viruses can also spread on phones if one person is sick with strep throat or influenza and coughs on their cell phone before handing it off to a friend. Still, the best advice has more to do with you than the phone. Wash your hands several times a day, the experts say, and you’ll likely be just fine. Here's a really useful video on how to wash your hands properly by the NHS: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-body/best-way-to-wash-your-hands/ KEEP YOUR PHONE OUT OF THE BATHROOM: One of the worst places to use your phone is in the bathroom. When toilets flush, they spread germs everywhere, which is how phones end up with faecal bacteria like E. coli. Taking a cell phone into the bathroom and then leaving with it is kind of like going in, not washing your hands and then coming back out, It’s the same level of concern. HOW TO CLEAN YOUR PHONE: We tested both cleaning methods in the lab with Dr Isreb and they were both effective at reducing the bacteria on my phone. Cleaning Method 1 (Safe Daily Cleaning Method), Just wipe your phone and buttons with a soft clean microfiber cloth, which will remove many of the germs. Cleaning Method 2 (Once Weekly Deep Clean), I've started to use this his method once a week and it hasn't damaged my phone. Please note however it may damage the protective coating on your screen so do it at your own risk. What you will need: • Bottled water or distilled water • 70% isopropyl alcohol • 1 Mini spray bottle • 1 Clean microfiber or lint-free cloth Step 1: Fill a spray bottle halfway with distilled or bottled water. Step 2: Fill the other half of the bottle with 70% isopropyl alcohol. Step 3: Screw the cap back on and shake the bottle to mix the solution. Step 4: Lightly spray the solution on a clean microfiber cloth and rub it all over your entire phone — especially those buttons! Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. #UniversityofBradford #bacteriaonphone #howtodisinfectphone
Views: 6748 AbrahamThePharmacist
Lower Back Pain | Lower Back Pain Exercises | How To Get Rid Of Back Pain (2019)
 
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Lower back pain. This video is on lower back pain exercises to give relief and get rid of back pain on right side, left side. Over 80% of the population will suffer from lower back pain during their lives. In this weeks video we're going to look at some simple back exercises and stretches you can do at home to help ease lower back pain and improve your strength and flexibility. A special thank you to Mo (Personal Trainer) for being so helpful with this weeks video and demonstrating the exercises. Feel free to show Mo some love on instagram @MoRavaei - https://www.instagram.com/moravaei ABOUT LOWER BACK PAIN: Back pain is very common and normally improves within a few weeks or months. Pain in the lower back (lumbago) is particularly common, although it can be felt anywhere along the spine – from the neck down to the hips. In most cases the pain isn't caused by anything serious and will usually get better over time. There are things you can do to help relieve it. But sometimes the pain can last a long time or keep coming back. HOW TO RELIEVE LOWER BACK PAIN: The following tips may help reduce your backache and speed up your recovery: • Stay as active as possible and try to continue your daily activities – this is one of the most important things you can do, as resting for long periods is likely to make the pain worse. • Try exercises and stretches for back pain; other activities such as walking, swimming, yoga and pilates may also be helpful. • Take anti-inflammatory painkillers, such as ibuprofen – remember to check the medicine is safe for you to take first and ask a pharmacist if you're not sure. • Use hot or cold compression packs for short-term relief – you can buy these from your local pharmacy, or a hot water bottle and a bag of frozen vegetables wrapped in a cloth will work just as well Although it can be difficult, it helps if you stay optimistic and recognise that your pain should get better, as people who manage to stay positive despite their pain tend to recover quicker. WHEN TO GET ADVICE: Back pain usually gets better on its own within a few weeks or months and you may not need to see a doctor or other healthcare professional. But it's a good idea to get help if: • The pain doesn't start to improve within a few weeks • The pain stops you doing your day-to-day activities • The pain is very severe or gets worse over time • You're worried about the pain or are struggling to cope You can see your GP, who will ask about your symptoms, examine your back, and discuss possible treatments. Alternatively, you may want to consider approaching a physiotherapist directly. Some NHS physiotherapists accept appointments without a doctor's referral, or you could choose to pay for private treatment. WHEN TO GET IMMEDIATE MEDICAL ADVICE: You should contact your GP or NHS 111 immediately if you have back pain and: • Numbness or tingling around your genitals or buttocks • Difficulty peeing • Loss of bladder or bowel control • Chest pain • A high temperature (fever) of 38C (100.4F) or above unexplained weight loss • A swelling or a deformity in your back • It doesn't improve after resting or is worse at night • It started after a serious accident, such as after a car accident These problems (red flags) could be a sign of something more serious and need to be checked urgently. I have tried my best to add as many red flag symptoms but incase I have missed anything please make sure to visit the following pages as well, https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/back-pain/ https://patient.info/health/back-and-spine-pain/lower-back-pain Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/+AbrahamThePharmacist https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 8817 AbrahamThePharmacist
What Causes Antibiotic Resistance | What Is Antibiotic Resistance |How To Stop Antibiotic Resistance
 
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What Causes Antibiotic Resistance | What Is Antibiotic Resistance | How To Stop Antibiotic Resistance - Bacterial Resistance - Antibiotic Awareness Week. Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, food security, and development today. It is estimated that 5,000 deaths are caused every year in England because antibiotics no longer work for some infections and this figure is set to rise with experts predicting that in just over 30 years antibiotic resistance will kill more people than cancer and diabetes combined. Antibiotics help ward off infections during chemotherapy, caesarean sections and other surgery. They also treat serious bacterial infections, such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis, but they are being used for everyday viral infections, such as colds or flu, where they are not effective. Taking antibiotics encourages harmful bacteria that live inside you to become resistant. That means that antibiotics may not work when you really need them. The overuse of antibiotics in recent years means they're becoming less effective and has led to the emergence of "superbugs". These are strains of bacteria that have developed resistance to many different types of antibiotics HOW TO LOOK AFTER YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY: If you or a family member are feeling unwell, have a cold or flu and you haven’t been prescribed antibiotics, here are some effective self-care ways to help you feel better: • Ask your pharmacist to recommend medicines to help with symptoms or pain. • Get plenty of rest. • Make sure you or your child drink enough to avoid feeling thirsty. • Fever is a sign the body is fighting the infection and usually gets better by itself in most cases. You can use paracetamol if you or your child are uncomfortable as a result of a fever. • Make sure to use a tissue for your nose and wash your hands frequently to avoid spreading your infection to family and friends. HOW LONG SHOULD YOUR SYMPTOMS LAST FOR? Here are a few guidelines to help you judge how long some common illnesses and symptoms should last for: • Earache (middle ear infection) most people are better by 8 days • Sore throat most people are better by 7–8 days • Sinusitis (adults only) most people are better by 14–21 days • Cold most people are better by 14 days • Cough or bronchitis most people are better by 21 days Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. KEYWORDS: • What causes antibiotic resistance • What is antibiotic resistance • How to stop antibiotic resistance • Antibiotic awareness week • Antibiotics and resistance • Bacterial resistance to antibiotics • Are antibiotics no longer working • Are antibiotics not working as well • Antibiotic resistance • Whats antibiotic resistance • Stop antibiotic resistance • Stop bacterial resistance • Antibiotic resistance explained simply • Why do we get antibiotic resistance • Antibiotics resistance 2017 • Antibiotics resistance 2018
Views: 9498 AbrahamThePharmacist
Birth Control Pills | Contraceptive Pills Guide | MINI PILL (2019)
 
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Birth Control Pills. This video is on the progesterone only pill (mini pill) instructions, missed pill, take, how to start the pill. This video is a guide on the "traditional" progestogen-only pill (POP) or Mini pill. Including commonly asked questions such as how to start taking it, when is it effective, what is considered a missed pill, what to do after a missed pill, vomiting, diarrhoea and medication interactions. A special thank you to Jo (Advanced Nurse Practitioner) for being so helpful with this weeks video. We will definitely be doing more videos together on contraceptives in the future. WHAT BIRTH CONTROL PILL ARE YOU TAKING: Remember there are two types of birth control pills - Combined oral contraceptives and progesterone only pills. This video is about the progesterone only pills. If you’re not sure what type of birth control pill you’ve been prescribed, please read the information leaflet and it will tell you the type. If you’ve lost this please use the link below to find your medication and category. https://www.drugs.com/drug_information.html QUICK FACTS ABOUT THE POP: - You take a pill every day, with no break between packs of pills. - The progestogen-only pill can be used by women who can't use contraception that contains oestrogen. - You can take the progestogen-only pill if you're over 35 and you smoke. - You must take the progestogen-only pill at the same time each day. If you take it more than 3 hours late (traditional progestogen-only pill) – or 12 hours late (desogestrel pill) – it may not be effective. - If you're sick (vomit) or have severe diarrhoea, the progestogen-only pill may not work. - Some medicines may affect the progestogen-only pill's effectiveness – ask your pharmacist or doctor for details. - Your periods may stop or become lighter, irregular or more frequent. - You'll need to use condoms as well as the progestogen-only pill to be protected against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). SICKNESS AND DIARRHOEA EFFECTS ON POPs: If you vomit within two hours of taking the POP or If you have very severe diarrhoea that continues for more than 24 hours. The POP won’t have been absorbed by your body. To find out what to do please visit the following links: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/contraception/the-pill-progestogen-only/ https://www.fpa.org.uk/sites/default/files/progestogen-only-pill-your-guide.pdf Speak to a pharmacist, nurse or GP, or call NHS 111 or the national sexual health helpline free on 0300 123 7123, if you're unsure whether you're protected against pregnancy, or if your sickness or diarrhoea continues. MEDICINE INTERACTIONS WITH THE POP: When you take 2 or more medicines at the same time, they can sometimes interact with each other.Some medicines interact with the progestogen-only pill, which can stop it working properly. If you want to check whether your medicines are safe to take with the progestogen-only pill, you can: - Ask your pharmacist, practice nurse or GP - Read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS: Most methods of contraception don’t protect you from sexually transmitted infections. Condoms (male/external or female/internal), when used correctly and consistently, can help protect against sexually transmitted infections. If you can, avoid using spermicidally lubricated condoms. The spermicide commonly contains a chemical called Nonoxinol 9, which may increase the risk of HIV infection. MORE INFORMATION: To find out more about POPs such as side effects, advantages, disadvantages, risks and further general information please visit the following links, https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/contraception/the-pill-progestogen-only/ https://www.fpa.org.uk/sites/default/files/progestogen-only-pill-your-guide.pdf Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 11548 AbrahamThePharmacist
Shingles Vaccine NHS | How To Prevent Shingles | Shingles Virus Information Causes & Symptoms (2018)
 
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NHS Shingles Vaccine Eligibility | Should I Get Shingles Vaccine | How To Stop Shingles | Shingles Vaccine Information | Shingles Vaccine Side Effects | What Causes Shingles Virus | Public Health England Shingles Hey guys! I've been really excited to show you this weeks video! I've teamed up with Public Health England on this one to help explain to everyone the importance of the NHS shingles vaccine and help increase its uptake amongst the elderly. Please help spread the word to friends and family who are between 70-80 years old so they can hopefully get vaccinated and protected from shingles. It's the best way to avoid the disease and long term complications that can develop from it. We have also timed the video to be released on European Immunisation Week (EIW) which promotes the core message that immunisation is vital to prevent diseases and protect life. Their slogan for the campaign– Prevent. Protect. Immunise. -Carries this message across the Region. EIW 2018 will be celebrated on 23–29 April 2018. WHAT IS SHINGLES? Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a painful skin rash caused by the reactivation of the chickenpox virus (varicella-zoster virus) in people who have previously had chickenpox. It begins with a burning sensation in the skin, followed by a rash of very painful fluid-filled blisters that can then burst and turn into sores before healing. Often an area on just one side of the body is affected, usually the chest but sometimes the head, face and eye. SYMPTOMS OF SHINGLES: The pain is a localised band of pain. It can be anywhere on your body, depending on which nerve is affected. The pain can range from mild to severe. You may have a constant dull, burning, or gnawing pain. In addition, or instead, you may have sharp and stabbing pains that come and go. The affected area of skin is usually tender. For more information please visit, https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/shingles/ WHO CAN HAVE THE FREE NHS SHINGLES VACCINE: You are eligible for the shingles vaccine if you are aged 70 or 78 years old. In addition, anyone who was eligible for immunisation in the previous three years of the programme but missed out on their shingles vaccination remains eligible until their 80th birthday. This includes: • People in their 70s who were born after 1 September 1942 • People aged 79 years The shingles vaccine is not available on the NHS if you are aged 80 or over. You can have the shingles vaccination at any time of year. Link to chart on video, https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/shingles-vaccination-eligibility-poster HOW DO I GET THE SHINGLES VACCINE: Once you become eligible for shingles vaccination your doctor will take the opportunity to vaccinate you when you attend the surgery for general reasons or for your annual flu vaccination. Contact your GP surgery if you have any further questions. HOW LONG WILL THE VACCINE PROTECT ME & IS IT SAFE: It's difficult to be precise, but research suggests the shingles vaccine will protect you for at least five years, probably longer. There is lots of evidence showing that the shingles vaccine is very safe. It's already been used in several countries, including the US and Canada, and no safety concerns have been raised. The vaccine also has few side effects see link for more information: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/shingles-vaccine-side-effects WHO IS MOST AT RISK OF SHINGLES: People tend to get shingles more often as they get older, especially over the age of 70. And the older you are, the worse it can be. The shingles rash can be extremely painful, such that sufferers can't even bear the feeling of their clothes touching the affected skin. The pain of shingles can also linger long after the rash has disappeared, even for many years. This lingering pain is called postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT) I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 3979 AbrahamThePharmacist
Diet Pills UK Side Effects | Danger Of Slimming Pills |Weight Loss Pills Side Effects #FakeMeds MHRA
 
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Diet Pills UK Side Effects | Danger Of Slimming tablets |Weight Loss tea Side Effects #FakeMeds MHRA Hey guys! This weeks I've teamed up with The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) who regulate all medicines in the UK. Our aim in this video, is to warn people about the dangers of buying potentially life threatening diet pills from illegal online suppliers. Almost 2 in 3 people suffered unpleasant side effects after taking dangerous online slimming pills, these included bleeding that wouldn’t stop, heart attacks, strokes and hallucinations! The contents of these unlicensed diet pills are unknown, not tested for safety and have been found stored in dirty, rat infested warehouses and garden sheds. Fake medical products and and dangerous diet pills are a big problem which the MHRA are working hard to end. The MHRA has seized nearly £3million worth of unlicensed slimming pills since April 2013, and closed down over 5,000 unauthorised online retailers in 2016. Research carried out by MHRA in 2016 showed that although shoppers believe themselves to be “internet-savvy”, 79% of the public are unaware of the issue of fake medical products. In fact more than half of all medicines bought online are fake! So please help spread the word - Like, Share & Tag Friends so more people can become aware of how to protect themselves, when buying medicines online. HOW TO STAY SAFE ONLINE WHEN BUYING MEDICINES: The #FakeMeds campaign run by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) gives you quick and easy tools to avoid fake medical products when shopping online: I highly recommend everyone visits their page at https://fakemeds.campaign.gov.uk/ for lots of great information - There's also 10 top tips on how to keep yourself safe online when buying medicines. HOW TO LOSE WEIGHT SAFELY: There are many reputable groups out there that can support you to lose weight through healthy lifestyle changes. Your pharmacist, GP or healthcare professional will also be able to advise you on finding the right option for you. Here are some links to some great guides and tips on how to lose weight safely: https://www.nhs.uk/livewell/loseweight/Pages/Loseweighthome.aspx https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/weight-loss-guide/Pages/successful-diet-tips.aspx https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/loseweight/Pages/start-losing-weight.aspx https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/loseweight/Pages/surprising-100-calorie-snacks.aspx Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 20612 AbrahamThePharmacist
Constipation | How To Get Rid Of Constipation | Constipation Relief (2019)
 
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Constipation Remedies. This video is on relief, remedies, symptoms, laxatives, cure, medicines and tablets to get rid of constipation. 1 in 7 adults are affected by constipation at any one time. Remember we're all different so we have different toilet habits but generally speaking constipation is either going to the toilet less often than usually to empty the bowels or passing hard or painful stools. In this video we're going to look at home remedies and laxatives for constipation relief in adults. Hope my tips help! CAUSES OF CONSTIPATION: Constipation in adults has many possible causes. Sometimes there is no obvious reason. The most common causes include: • Not eating enough fibre – such as fruit, vegetables and cereals • Not drinking enough fluids • Not exercising or being less active • Often ignoring the urge to go to the toilet • Changing your diet or daily routine • Stress, anxiety or depression • A side effect of medication Constipation is also common during pregnancy and for 6 weeks after giving birth. PLEASE NOTE: Laxatives are not recommended in pregnancy unless prescribed or recommended by your healthcare professional. In much rarer cases, constipation may be caused by a medical condition. LIFESTYLE CHANGES TO TREAT CONSTIPATION: • A really easy way to help reduce straining when empty your bowels is by raising your feet by resting them on a stool while your sat on the toilet and if possible raise your knees above your hips. This straightens out where the colon and rectum join and allows your stool to pass more easily. Also give yourself plenty of time and don’t delay if you feel the urge. • Make your stools softer and easier to pass by, drinking plenty of water so aim for 6-8 glasses a day and increasing the fibre in your diet so have more fruit, vegetables and oats. NHS Link to increasing fibre in diet: https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/how-to-get-more-fibre-into-your-diet • Increase your activity so go for a walk do more exercise and this will lower the time it takes food to move through the large intestine. So you’ll empty your bowels more regularly. The longer your stools stay in the large intestine the more water is absorbed from the stool which leaves you with dry stools that are harder to pass. LAXATIVES TO TREAT CONSTIPATION: Laxatives are a type of medicine that can help you empty your bowels if you're having trouble going to the toilet. They're widely used to treat constipation if lifestyle changes haven't helped. It’s important to remember that laxatives should be stopped when your constipation improves. Laxatives are available from pharmacies. Please speak to your pharmacist before purchasing so they can check its the right one for you and you’re suitable and safe to take them. As always with all medication always read the information leaflet. Certain medication can also cause constipation so let your pharmacist know what you're taking. Laxatives should only be used for a short period and are not recommended for children and in pregnancy unless prescribed, here are the different laxatives discussed in the video. Bulk forming laxatives: Such as ispaghula husk. Osmotic laxatives: Such as lactulose and macrogol. Stimulant laxatives: Such as bisacodyl, senna and sodium picosulfate. Stool softener laxatives: Such as docusate sodium and glycerol. WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR: • You are not improving with treatment • You are regularly constipated and it lasts a long time • You are bloated and it lasts a long time • You have blood in your poo • You have unexpectedly lost weight • You feel very tired all the time Speak to the GP before you stop taking any prescribed medication. MORE INFORMATION ON CONSTIPATION AND LAXATIVES: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/constipation https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/laxatives Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/+AbrahamThePharmacist https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 7760 AbrahamThePharmacist
Cold Sores | How To Treat A Cold Sore | How To Prevent Cold Sores | How To Get Rid Cold Sore  (2018)
 
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How To Treat Cold Sores | How To Stop Getting Cold Sores | How To Prevent A Cold Sore When You Feel It Coming | Cold Sore Treatments Hey guys! This weeks video is about cold sores, how to prevent them and how to try and treat them. I couldn't find any information to clinically prove the effectiveness of some cold sore remedies seen online like distilled vinegar, witch hazel and alcohol, so I can't recommend them. But feel free to leave a comment if you've tried them to let us know how effective they were. WHAT ARE COLD SORES: About 1 in 5 people in the UK have recurring cold sores. Cold sores usually resolve on their own without treatment in 7-10 days. Cold sores, also known as fever blisters or oral herpes, are very common. They can be easy to recognise as they usually appear as red bumps or blisters around the lips and mouth. Cold sores are caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), the oral form of the virus. In fact, 67% of the world population under age 50 has HSV-1 because it is so contagious Once you are infected, the virus never leaves your body. Most people aren’t exactly sure when they first encountered the virus. It’s usually contracted in early childhood where it may not appear as a visible cold sore. HOW DO COLD SORES SPREAD: The oral herpes virus is spread through direct skin-to-skin contact. It is even contagious when you can’t see a cold sore. Most people first contract the cold sore virus (HSV-1) when they are very young, usually by skin-to-skin contact with an adult carrying the virus. The virus can spread in various ways: through kissing, or by sharing objects like toothbrushes, water bottles, drinking glasses, and silverware. It is also possible to spread the virus from the mouth to the genitals, eyes, and other parts of the body. COLD SORE TRIGGERS WHICH MAY BE PREVENTED: Not everyones cold sores are triggered by the same thing, but these triggers are the ones which could be avoided to prevent a cold sore attack. • Stress can wear down your immune system, giving that dormant cold sore a chance to launch a sneak attack. Instead, when you feel stressed, breathe deeply and relax. Here’s a look at some relaxation techniques that can help you take it easy -https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/understanding-stress/ • Being tired can make you vulnerable to cold sores. Like stress and illness, fatigue can zap your immune system, making you easy prey for a cold sore outbreak. Getting rest is key. Link to my video to help you get a better night sleep - https://youtu.be/m_ZHgD5rVPU • If you find that sunlight triggers your cold sores, try using sunscreen lip balm (SPF 15 or more) before going out into bright sunlight. This has been found to prevent some bouts of cold sores in some people. Do not share lip balms with other people if you have cold sores. • Prevent chapped lips in the cold by using a hydrating lip balm. COLD SORE TREATMENT: Aciclovir can be bought over-the-counter (OTC) at pharmacies. This does not kill the virus but prevents the virus from multiplying. It has little effect on existing blisters but may prevent them from becoming worse. The cream may provide some protection against cold sores caused by sunlight if it is used before exposure. If you use an antiviral cream as soon as symptoms start then the cold sore may not last as long as usual and may be less severe. There is debate as to how well the cream works. WHEN TO SEE YOUR GP: You should see your GP if you are unsure of the diagnosis, or if the cold sores are not resolving after a week or so. If you have a poor immune system (you are an immunocompromised person) and develop possible cold sores, you should see your GP. You may need tests to confirm the virus, and/or oral antiviral medicines. For full list please visit: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cold-sores/ Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 75054 AbrahamThePharmacist
Hiccups | How To Get Rid Of Hiccups (2018)
 
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Hiccups cure. This video is on treatment, cures and how to stop and get rid of hiccups fast, as well as what are hiccups. A hiccup is an automatic action (a reflex) that the body can't control. During a hiccup your diaphragm (the muscle under your lungs that helps you breathe) contracts. Immediately after this the top of your windpipe (your glottis) closes, making the typical 'hic' sound. I hope my tips help you and good luck! By the way maybe we can do our own little science experiment and see which remedy works best, so please leave a comment below and let me know which one works for you. I will then tally the results up and leave a pinned comment, this may be useful for everyone in the future. HICCUPS SYMPTOMS: Everyone has had hiccups, and knows exactly what they are and what they feel like. They affect women and men equally, although persistent hiccups occur much more commonly in men. They happen mainly in the evening. There is an important difference between short bouts of hiccups and persistent hiccups (lasting longer than 48 hours). Persistent hiccups are more likely to be linked to an underlying illness and you may need medical tests. CAUSES OF SHORT BOUT HICCUPS: Most people have bouts of hiccups from time to time. In most cases they start for no apparent reason, last a short while and then stop. Sometimes they are due to: • Sudden excitement or emotional stress. • A temporary swollen stomach caused by overeating or eating too fast, drinking fizzy drinks, or swallowing air. • A sudden change in temperature (very hot or cold food or drinks, a cold shower, etc). • Alcohol. • Excess smoking. CAUSES OF PERSISTENT HICCUPS: Persistent hiccups are rare. In some cases, persistent hiccups are caused by an underlying disease. Over 100 diseases have been reported to cause hiccups. Some are common, such as acid reflux, and some are rare. You would normally have other symptoms apart from the hiccups. In some cases of persistent hiccups there is no apparent cause. However, the persistent hiccups can become exhausting and distressing. Examples of conditions which can cause persistent hiccups can be found at the following link: https://patient.info/health/hiccups-hiccoughs Please see your doctor if you have persistent hiccups (lasting longer than 48 hours), as medical tests and investigations may be required. HICCUP REMEDIES: There are many popular remedies that are said to stop a short bout of hiccups but they are based on people's individual experiences. It is not clear how effective they are, as they have not been tested by research trials. They include the following: •Using a technique called the Valsalva manoeuvre. The way to do this is to take a deep breath in, then keep the air inside you while pushing with your muscles as if to force the air out. This is like pushing in childbirth or straining on the toilet. • Remedy from Dr Eric Voigt and apparently it has a high success rate. Drink water from the opposite side so tilt your head down and drink the water this way. Because of the way the abdomen contracts it may stop hiccups. • Swallowing granulated sugar. • Sipping iced water. • Biting on a lemon or tasting vinegar. • Pulling on the tongue. • Breathing- Either hold your breath for a short time, breath fast or breathe into a paper bag. • Compress the diaphragm by either pulling the knees up to the chest or leaning forward. • Swallow water while closing the nose. • Ask someone to scare you. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 50426 AbrahamThePharmacist
Chickenpox Treatment | Treatment For Chickenpox | Chickenpox Symptoms | Signs Of Chickenpox | 2018
 
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Chicken Pox Treatment | How To Treat Chickenpox | Symptoms of Chickenpox | Signs Of Chicken Pox Hey all, this weeks video is about Chickenpox and how to treat it. I think I have had over 300 messages from parents to do a video on this topic so without further ado here it is. Leave a comment below with how you get on and feel free to share any of your own useful tips which others may found helpful. If you have any friends or family who would benefit from this video then feel free to spread the word. WHAT IS CHICKENPOX: Chickenpox is a highly contagious infection, which means it spreads easily from person to person. If you’ve not had chickenpox before and someone in your household gets it, it’s very likely you’ll catch it too. Chickenpox is a common infection caused by the varicella zoster virus. It causes an itchy, spotty rash. The spots start flat then become raised and blistered, before crusting over. For most people, chickenpox isn’t serious. You’ll probably feel better after a week or so. You can catch chickenpox at any time of year, but it’s most likely in spring. It’s most common in children under 10, but you can catch it at any age. Once you have had chickenpox, you’re very unlikely to catch it again. About nine out of 10 adults are immune as a result of catching chickenpox when they were a child. If you’ve had chickenpox, the varicella zoster virus will stay dormant in your body for the rest of your life. At any time later in life, the virus could be reactivated, causing shingles. SYMPTOMS OF CHICKENPOX: 1. Chickenpox starts with red spots. They can appear anywhere on the body. 2. The spots fill with fluid. The blisters may burst. They might spread or stay in a small area. 3. The spots scab over. More blisters might appear while others scab over. Other symptoms: You might get symptoms before or after the spots, including: • A high temperature above 38C • Aches and pains, and generally feeling unwell • Loss of appetite Chickenpox is very itchy and can make children feel miserable, even if they don't have many spots. Chickenpox is usually much worse in adults. If you're not sure it's chickenpox you can also visit the following link which includes pictures that will help: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/chickenpox/ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/rashes-babies-and-children/ IMPORTANT INFORMATION & WHEN TO SEEK URGENT MEDICAL ATTENTION: • If you have chickenpox don't be around pregnant women, newborn babies and people with a weakened immune system, as it can be dangerous for them. • Don't use ibuprofen unless advised to do so by your doctor, as it may cause a serious skin infections called necrotising fasciitis. • Don't give aspirin to children under 16. Speak to a GP if: • You're not sure it's chickenpox. • The skin around the blisters is red, hot or painful (signs of infection) your child is dehydrated. • You're concerned about your child or they get worse. Tell the receptionist you think it's chickenpox before going in. They may recommend a special appointment time if other patients are at risk. Ask for an urgent GP appointment if: • You're an adult and have chickenpox. • You're pregnant and haven't had chickenpox before and have been near someone with it. • You have a weakened immune system and have been near someone with chickenpox. • You think your newborn baby has chickenpox. In these situations, your GP can prescribe medicine to prevent complications. You need to take it within 24 hours of the spots coming out. Please also visit the link below, it contains more information on when to seek medical attention: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/chickenpox/ If you have any further questions please speak to your pharmacist or other healthcare professionals. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. #chickenpox #chickenpoxtreatment
Views: 86112 AbrahamThePharmacist
Should Children Take Vitamins | What Age Do Babies Need Vitamins | Best Childrens Baby Vitamins
 
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Should Kids Take Vitamins | What Age Do Children Need Vitamins | Best Baby Vitamins | Multi vitamins For Children | Do Breastfed Babies Need Vitamins | Healthy Start Vitamin Drops Hey guys! This weeks video is all about vitamin supplements for children and why you should be giving them to children aged six months to five years. I was quite shocked when I recently read research that was presented at the Welsh Paediatric Society autumn clinical meeting. Researchers in Wales found only 30% of parents and carers said they had ever been given advice by a health professional about giving young children vitamin supplements. And nearly two-thirds (64%) of those asked said they didn't give their children vitamin supplements. DO CHILDREN NEED VITAMINS? The Department of Health (DoH) recommends all children aged 6 months to 5 years should be given supplements containing vitamins A, C and D every day. This advice has been in existence since the early 1990s, when it was endorsed by the then committee on medical aspects of food policy. However If your child is having 500ml or more of infant formula a day, they do not need any children's vitamin supplements as infant formula is fortified. Vitamins and minerals are essential for children's good health, Vitamin A: for growth, vision in dim light and healthy skin Vitamin C: helps maintain healthy tissue in the body Vitamin D: for strong bones and teeth. Growing children may not get enough of these vitamins - especially those not eating a varied diet. Breastfed babies from birth to one year of age should be given a daily supplement containing 8.5-10mcg of vitamin D to make sure they get enough. Please speak to your midwife about this if you're not already doing this. HOW TO APPLY FOR FREE HEALTHY START VITAMINS: Visit https://www.healthystart.nhs.uk/ to check if you are eligible to apply for free healthy start vitamins and to find a retailer near you. HEALTHY EATING ADVICE FOR CHILDREN: https://www.nhs.uk/change4life https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/the-eatwell-guide.aspx https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/5ADAY/Pages/Family.aspx Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 10968 AbrahamThePharmacist
How To Use Steroid Cream | How To Use Steroid Ointment | How To Use Steroid Cream For Eczema (2018)
 
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Steroid Cream For Eczema | How To Apply Steroid Cream For Eczema | How To Use Steroid Cream Safely | How To Reduce Steroid Cream Side Effects | How To Use Moisturiser and Steroid Cream | What is A Fingertip Unit Hey guys! This weeks video is about topical steroids, how to use them safely and properly. Topical steroids are used in addition to emollients (moisturisers) and are applied directly to the skin to reduce inflammation and irritation in various skin conditions such as eczema. WHAT ARE TOPICAL STEROIDS: Topical steroids work by reducing inflammation in the skin. They are used for various skin conditions including eczema. (Steroid medicines that reduce inflammation are sometimes called corticosteroids. They are very different to the anabolic steroids which are used by some bodybuilders and athletes.) There are many types and brands of topical steroid. However, they are generally grouped into four categories depending on their strength - mild, moderately potent, potent and very potent. There are various brands and types in each category. For example, hydrocortisone cream 1% is a commonly used steroid cream and is classed as a mild topical steroid. The greater the strength (potency), the more effect it has on reducing inflammation but the greater the risk of side-effects with continued use. Creams are usually best to treat moist or weeping areas of skin. Ointments are usually best to treat areas of skin which are dry or thickened. Lotions may be useful to treat hairy areas such as the scalp. HOW TO APPLY TOPICAL STEROIDS: Always follow your healthcare professionals instructions on how much to apply and how often. Most people only need to use the medication once or twice a day for a week or two, although occasionally your doctor may suggest using it less frequently over a longer period of time. The medication should only be applied to affected areas of skin. Gently smooth it into your skin in the direction the hair grows. If you're using both topical corticosteroids and emollients, you should apply the emollient first. Then wait about 15 minutes before applying the topical corticosteroid. FINGER TIP UNITS: The amount of topical steroid that you should apply is commonly measured by fingertip units (FTUs). One FTU is the amount of topical steroid that is squeezed out from a standard tube along an adult's fingertip. (This assumes the tube has a standard 5 mm nozzle.) A fingertip is from the very end of the finger to the first crease in the finger. One FTU is enough to treat an area of skin twice the size of the flat of an adult's hand with the fingers together. Two FTUs are about the same as 1 g of topical steroid. For example, say you treat an area of skin the size of eight adult hands. You will need four FTUs for each dose. (This is 2 g per dose. If the dose is once a day, then a 30 g tube should last for about 15 days of treatment.) Please visit the following links for more information on topical steroids and the FTUs for different parts of the body: https://patient.info/health/atopic-eczema/topical-steroids-for-eczema https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/topical-steroids/#how-to-use-topical-corticosteroids SIDE EFFECTS: Short courses of topical steroids (fewer than four weeks) are usually safe and usually cause no problems. Problems may develop if topical steroids are used for long periods, or if short courses of stronger steroids are repeated often. The main concern is if strong steroids are used on a long-term basis. Side-effects from mild topical steroids are uncommon. Side-effects from topical steroids can either be local or systemic. Local means just affecting that bit of skin and systemic means affecting the whole person. Please visit the links above for more information on topical steroids. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 47622 AbrahamThePharmacist
Blood Pressure Causes | Responding To Your Comments (2019)
 
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Blood Pressure Causes. This video is the start of my new monthly series responding to your comments and questions. One of my favourite notifications is your comments and as you may already know more often than not I'll get back to you with a reply and heart. If you'd like more information on any of the questions I've answered or have a question, then let me know so I can try and either dedicate a video to it or get back to you in next months responding to your comments. A few of my favourite questions/comments from this video are: 1) When is the best time for teens to take multivitamins? 2) "Bruh the first time I did that salt water thing I puked lol" 3) How long does it take you to make your tutorial videos since there are so many difference scenes? 4) "GMTV need to pick you as their next doctor" 5) Where do you get video ideas from? 6) Is 13 old enough for salt water gargling? 7) My mother doesn't smoke, drink alcohol or coffee and has a very low salt intake but her blood pressure is still very high. What is causing this? 8) Could you do a video on your pharmacy background? e.g. University advice, how you secured your job in a GP practice, an overview on your thoughts about being a pharmacist. It would be very helpful. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/+AbrahamThePharmacist https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 5749 AbrahamThePharmacist
Insect Bites and Stings | Insect Bites Treatment | How to Treat Insect Bites and Stings | 2018
 
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Whether it's a wasp sting, bee sting, hornet sting, tick bite or horsefly bite this complete guide will teach you how to treat and identify them. Hey everyone, this weeks video is about how to identify and treat insect bites or stings. With the recent warm weather we have had in the UK, Public Health England have revealed that calls to the NHS helpline 111 about insect bites are almost double the rate they normally are at this time of year. So I decided to make a video to help anyone who has recently been bit or stung by an insect. Feel free to spread the knowledge to friends and family. WHEN TO GET MEDICAL ADVICE: Contact your GP, Pharmacist or call NHS 111 for advice if, • You're worried about a bite or sting. • Your symptoms don't start to improve within a few days or are getting worse. • You've been stung or bitten in your mouth or throat, or near your eyes a large area (around 10cm or more) around the bite becomes red and swollen. • You have symptoms of a wound infection, such as pus or increasing pain, swelling or redness. • You have symptoms of a more widespread infection, such as a fever, swollen glands and other flu-like symptoms. WHEN TO GET EMERGENCY MEDICAL HELP: Dial 999 for an ambulance immediately if you or someone else has symptoms of a severe reaction, such as: • Wheezing or difficulty breathing • A swollen face, mouth or throat • Nausea or vomiting • A fast heart rate • Dizziness or feeling faint • Difficulty swallowing • Loss of consciousness Emergency treatment in hospital is needed in these cases. For more information about anaphylaxis and what to do please visit: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/anaphylaxis/ WHAT TO DO AFTER AN INSECT BITE OR STING: To treat an insect bite or sting, • Remove the sting or tick if it's still in the skin (As demonstrated in video). • Wash the affected area with soap and water. • Apply a cold compress (such as a flannel or cloth cooled with cold water) or an ice pack to any swelling for at least 10 minutes. • Raise or elevate the affected area if possible, as this can help reduce swelling. • Avoid scratching the area, to reduce the risk of infection. • Avoid traditional home remedies, such as vinegar and bicarbonate of soda, as they're unlikely to help. • The pain, swelling and itchiness can sometimes last a few days. Ask your pharmacist about over-the-counter treatments that can help, such as painkillers, creams for itching and antihistamines. LYME DISEASES AND REMOVING TICKS: Lyme disease is a bacterial infection that can be spread to humans by infected ticks. It's usually easier to treat if it's diagnosed early. For more information on Lyme disease and removing ticks properly please visit: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/lyme-disease/ PREVENTING INSECT BITES: There are some simple precautions you can take to reduce your risk of being bitten or stung by insects, • Remain calm and move away slowly if you encounter wasps, hornets or bees – don't wave your arms around or swat at them. • Cover exposed skin by wearing long sleeves and trousers. • Wear shoes when outdoors. • Apply insect repellent to exposed skin – repellents that contain 50% DEET (diethyltoluamide) are most effective. • Avoid using products with strong perfumes, such as soaps, shampoos and deodorants – these can attract insects. • Be careful around flowering plants, rubbish, compost, stagnant water, and in outdoor areas where food is served. • You may need to take extra precautions if you're travelling to part of the world where there's a risk of serious illnesses. For example, you may be advised to take antimalarial tablets to help prevent malaria. More information visit: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/insect-bites-and-stings/ Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Extreme Optimist | Bringing Science Through New Videos Every 2 Weeks - Monday 4PM(GMT). I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions. #insectbitesandstings #insectbitestreatment #insectstingtreatment
Views: 19798 AbrahamThePharmacist
Does It Matter When You Take Medication | When Is An Empty Stomach | Medicine Before or After food
 
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Does It Matter When You Take Medication | When Is An Empty Stomach What Does it Mean | Medicine Before or After food. I was inspired to make this video after being asked on many occasions by patients when to take their medication and if the instructions on the medicine label are important. Here are some of the questions patients would ask me about: • When is an empty stomach ? • Why must medicine be taken on an empty stomach ? • Does it matter when you take medication ? • When is your stomach empty after eating ? • Why is some medication better on an empty stomach ? • Why does medication time matter ? • Medication on an empty stomach ? • Does medication timing matter ? • Medicine before or after food ? • What does take on an empty stomach mean ? • Take on an empty stomach what does it mean ? • Take on an empty stomach meaning ? Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 9222 AbrahamThePharmacist
NHS Stoptober 2017 | Quit Smoking With Support | Stoptober App | Stop Smoking | NHS Smoking Support
 
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NHS Stoptober 2017 | Quit Smoking With Support | Stoptober App | Stop Smoking | NHS Smoking Support. Stop Smoking For 28 days & You're 5 Times More Likely To Quit! Over a million people have used the Stoptober 28 day challenge to quit smoking and that’s amazing. I think Stoptober is such an important idea - about 100,000 people in the UK die each year due to smoking mainly due to cancer, lung diseases and heart disease. So let's try and get more people to quit smoking with Stoptober! Please share this video to friends and family to support them in their journey. Remember don't go at it alone speak to any healthcare professional about it pharmacies are particularly useful as you can visit anytime for advice without an appointment. Even brief advice can boost your chances of quitting by 30%. Here are some useful links to help anyone who wants to quit smoking: Stoptober Website: https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/stoptober/home?gclid=CjwKCAjwjozPBRAqEiwA6xTOYKZqRKwXpp2OfoS8GjGhRc3qXjd8cVeee9en9VKh5XOhxrSpnUQFMBoCGhUQAvD_BwE#UeV4cHb56JqkHyK3.97 NHS Smoke Free: https://www.nhs.uk/smokefree NHS One You: https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/smoking#VehvpaOp0Fp1z0UQ.97 Here are some related keywords for this video: • NHS Stoptober 2017 • NHS smoke free 2017 • Quit smoking stoptober • Quit smoking NHS • How to join stoptober • Stoptober app • NHS quit smoking app • NHS stop smoking app • Smoking NHS • NHS stop smoking support service • Stop smoking stoptober • NHS stop smoking stoptober • Stop smoking campaign stoptober • How to quit smoking NHS • NHS smoking support • NHS support for stopping smoking • Stop smoking for 28 days • Quit smoking for 28 days • Help to quit smoking • Stoptober • Stoptober support Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 1773 AbrahamThePharmacist
Ask Your Pharmacist | Abraham The Pharmacist On BBC Radio Leeds | Media Pharmacist On BBC
 
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Public Health Pharmacist | Abraham The Pharmacist On BBC Radio Leeds | Media Pharmacist On BBC | What Do Pharmacist Know | What Do Pharmacist Do | How Can A Pharmacist Help | Ask Your Pharmacist Hey guys! I was asked by BBC radio Leeds to join Andrew Edwards on his radio show. Had a really great time live on air taking questions from people whilst promoting pharmacy. We had many calls on the day but unfortunately didn't have time to answer all the questions live on air. Will keep everyone updated when I will next be on. Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 1709 AbrahamThePharmacist
Why It's Dangerous To Take Tablets Without Water | Can You Take Swallow Capsules Pills Without Water
 
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Why It's Dangerous To Take Tablets Without Water | Can You Take Swallow Capsules Pills Without Water Is It Ok Or Dangerous. I was inspired to make this video after patients and even friends would sometimes tell me that they take their medication without any water! This should never be done pills, capsules, tablets and medication should always be taken with water as its dangerous for your health as explained in the video. Here are some of the questions patients and friends would ask me about: • Can you swallow pills without water ? • Can you swallow medication without water ? • Can you swallow capsules without water ? • Is it dangerous to swallow tablets without water ? • Is it dangerous to swallow capsules without water ? • Can you take pills without water ? • Can you take capsules without water ? • Should you take pills with water ? • Should you take capsules with water ? • Can you take tablets without water ? • Is ok to take capsules without water ? • Is ok to take tablets without water ? Want to see more videos about everything health and pharmacy? Let me know in the comments below. Subscribe for new videos ▶https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist LET'S CONNECT: http://facebook.com/AbrahamThePharmacist http://instagram.com/AbrahamThePharmacist https://www.linkedin.com/in/AbrahamThePharmacist https://plus.google.com/u/4/109698449114086481589 https://twitter.com/AbrahamThePharm https://www.AbrahamThePharmacist.com https://www.youtube.com/c/AbrahamThePharmacist ABOUT ME: Prescribing Media Pharmacist | Bringing Science Through New Film Every Monday | Extreme Optimist I'm a British - Persian - Iranian prescribing media pharmacist who loves science, making videos and helping people. I work in both GP surgeries and community pharmacy. DISCLAIMER: This video is for information only and should not be used for the diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Abraham The Pharmacist has used all reasonable care in compiling the information but make no warranty as to its accuracy. Always consult a doctor or other health care professional for diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions.
Views: 5332 AbrahamThePharmacist

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